Shropshire History

Shropshire

Mills

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The definition of a mill is a building equipped with machinery for grinding grain into flour or for a particular manufacturing process. The earliest mills were operated by water and then windmills were introduced. These were replaced in the 19th Century by more efficient steam engines that did not rely on weather conditions that could cause streams to dry up or wind to cease blowing.

 

Watermills

 

A watermill is a structure that uses a waterwheel or turbine to drive machinery inside the mill. Water is diverted from a river or millpond along a channel called a leat and controlled by a sluice gate. It is then directed onto the paddles of the wheel and the force rotates it around an axle that drives a horizontal shaft. In corn mills, this horizontal motion was converted into vertical motion to turn the millstones by means of gears. Water leaving the wheel is drained along another channel called a tail race. Waterwheels are of 4 different types, depending on where the water hits the wheel paddles, ie

 

Undershot

The undershot waterwheel is simply set into the flow of the mill race and the force of water acts against fixed paddles on the outside of the wheel. It is cheap but inefficient because it impedes its own operation.

 

Breastshot

The breastshot waterwheel is more efficient than the undershot waterwheel and water is directed from the leat along a wooden trough called a launder. The water flows off the end of the launder and strikes buckets half way up the wheel. The bottom of the wheel is clear of the water in the tail race so is not slowed down. 

 

Overshot

The overshot waterwheel was more efficient than the breastshot waterwheel and about 2½ times more efficient than the undershot water wheel. It brings water to the top of the wheel along a launder, where it fills buckets built into the wheel. As the buckets fill, the weight of the water turns the wheel and gravity acts on the motion for longer. The water spills out of the bucket on the down side into the tail race. Since the wheel itself is set above this, the water never impedes the speed of the wheel. Overshot waterwheels require the millpond to be higher than the tail race so the leat feeding them can be quite long.

 

Pitchback

An inherent problem in the overshot waterwheel is that it reverses the rotation of the wheel. If a miller wished to convert an undershot or  breastshot waterwheel to an overshot waterwheel, all of the machinery in the mill had to be rebuilt to take account of the change in rotation. An alternative solution was the pitchback waterwheel. With this, water does not flow straight off the end of the launder but is diverted backwards to fill the buckets so that the direction remains the same as before.

 

Pelton Wheel

In the 1870s, Lester Pelton invented a water turbine called the Pelton Wheel but it came a little too late for most traditional mills, which by then had closed. It was like a small metal waterwheel but with cups rather than buckets. Water was directed onto the cups via a nozzle, causing them to spin quickly and thus turn the drive shaft.

 

Windmills

 

Windmills rely on the power of wind to turn sails and power machinery inside the mill. There are 3 types of windmill, ie

 

Post Mill

The post mill was the earliest type of windmill and was so-called because the whole body of the mill was mounted on a single vertical post, around which it could be turned to bring the sails into the wind. The earliest post mills are thought to have been built in the 12th Century.

 

Tower Mill

A tower mill consisted of a brick or stone tower, on which was a wooden “cap” or roof, which could be rotated to bring the sails into the wind. This rotating cap on a firm masonry base gave tower mills great advantages over post mills, as they could be built much higher and held larger sails. It is believed to have been introduced into Britain in the late 13th Century. The tower mill was more powerful than a watermill and was able to generate about 20-30 horsepower.

 

Wind Engine

The wind engine was invented by John Titt In 1876 for pumping water. The blades of the wheel were moved by the wind and were turned into the wind by a fantail. A single or double fantail was available and three types were manufactured, ie

 

Woodcock Engine - was a conventional iron windpump with a wheel of either 10ft or 12ft diameter. It could be supplied with a wood or steel tower and  could pump water to a total height of 150ft.

 

Simplex Direct Engine - had a wheel diameter of either 14ft, 16ft, 18ft, 20ft or 25 ft. A 25ft high tower was supplied as standard but could be made to any height a customer desired at extra cost.

 

Simplex Geared Engine – had wheels of the same sizes as the direct engine and was also available in 30ft, 35ft  and 40 ft diameters. A 25ft tower was standard for the smallest three sizes and the larger sizes came with a 35ft tower as standard. Again, an even taller tower could be supplied at extra cost.

 

 

Ashford Mill

 

Benson Hydro Scheme

 

Brockton Mill

 

Broseley’s Windmills

 

Cleobury Mill

 

Clun Mill

 

Daniel’s Mill

 

Dinham Mill

 

National Mills Weekend

 

Rockhill Mill

 

Whitcot Mill

 

Wrickton Watermill

 

 

 

Gazetteer of Sites

 

Albrighton - Albrighton Mill (SJ802039)

albrighton

Tower windmill built in 1768 and now converted into a 3 storey house. Sandstone ashlar base with stepped plinth, red brick upper part, strengthened by iron straps, and projecting wooden upper storey.

 

Albrighton - Kingswood Mill (SJ818042)

Windmill built in 1827.

 

Alderbury - Rew Wood Mill (SJ349141)

Post windmill demolished by 1774.

 

Alderbury - Rowton Mill (SJ366129)

rowton mill

Windmill built in 1774. The remains are 3 storeys high.

 

Ashford Carbonel - Ashford Mill (SO521710)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century. Complete with external waterwheel, two pairs of stones and internal turbine to saw timber and generate electricity.

 

Asterley – Asterley Mill (SJ373075)

Asterley

Tower windmill built in 1809. Now restored complete with sails.

 

Astley Abbotts – Frogg Mill (SO69809764)

Watermill and millpond believed to date from 1625. Now demolished.

 

Aston Botterell - Wrickton Mill (SO642848)

Watermill dating from the 18th Century with 19th Century additions and machinery. It has an external overshot waterwheel driving three pairs of millstones, which have been restored to working order.

 

Aston Eyre – Aldenham Mill (SO651956)

Watermill, with 5 tiny mill pools, is shown on the Aldenham Estate map of 1722. The brick upper part of the present building is late 18th Century but the lower stone part is probably original.

 

Barrow – Bould Mill (SO68189826)

Watermill believed to date from 1618. Now demolished.

 

Barrow - Littleford Mill (SO68739810)

Watermill believed to date from 1625. Now demolished.

 

Bayston Hill - Lyth Hill Mill (SJ470068)

Tower windmill built in 1835. It processed hemp and flax fibres, also driving a rope walk.

 

Benson’s Brook Hydro Scheme, Clee Hill (SO574768)

Built by the Field & Mackay Quarry Company to provide a head of water to drive a hydraulic engine that operated a stone crushing plant. In 1885, a reservoir was built at SO581771 and the water was taken down the hillside in a 10” diameter cast iron pipes. The pipeline crossed over the stream at SO575769 and the turbine was situated just beyond this point, at the eastern end of the Bitterley rail yard. The reservoir still holds water and the pipes are clearly visible in places. There is a substantial stone retaining wall roughly 200ft long. About halfway along this, at its base, is the outlet from the turbine. It is a tunnel approximately 3ft high and 4ft wide. Other remains include a stone arched bridge, the hydro penstock pipe and a 23ft high dam.

 

Benthall – Benthall Mill (SJ6723803198)

The earliest water mill was built before 1785 and was a small two-storey stone building with a small waterwheel. It was replaced by another stone-built watermill between 1785-1799 and a larger waterwheel was installed. The front wall of the east bay was subsequently rebuilt in brick and a major rebuilding occurred between 1850-1900 when the wheel was replaced, the mill buildings were extensively altered and a steam drive was incorporated. There was a decline in the use of the mill between 1900-1925, when the mill was sold. It was used as a slaughter house until the 1940s and then fell into disrepair. Part of the mill collapsed in 1987 though the layout of the site largely survives intact.

 

Bishop’s Castle - Brockton Mill (SO326859)

Watermill for corn working in 19th Century. Still has machinery and 3 pairs of stones but waterwheel removed

 

Bishop’s Castle – Lydham Manor Mill (SO327897)

Windmill built in 1805.

 

Bourton – Henmoor Hill Mill (SO5996)

Windmill built in 1717 on Henmoor Hill.

 

Bridgnorth - Pendlestone Mill (SO72389435)

http://media.rightmove.co.uk/76k/75673/22922319/75673_763000089_IMG_01_0000.jpg

Textile mill built about 1845 for Thomas Whitmore of Apley Hall.  Known as Fort Pendlestone because of its eccentric design with turrets and castellation. Originally powered by water with a leat from the north but this was replaced by a steam engine in 1866. Now converted to apartments.

 

Brockton – Brockton Mill (SJ31780460)

Watermill for corn working from the late 18th Century. Now converted to a private dwelling and consists of 2 storeys of roughly coursed limestone rubble and slab masonry with red brick addition and slate roof.

 

Bromfield - Bromfield Mill (SO481767)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century.

 

Broome – Station Mill (SJ399808)

Titt iron wind engine erected at the railway station in 1895 for the London & North Western Railway. Presumably to fill a water tank for topping up steam locomotive boilers.

 

Broseley - Ferney Bank Mill (SJ670025)

Windmill working in 1776 and leased by Leonard Jennings. In 1838 it was leased to Jeremiah Ashwood and was still standing in 1881.

 

Broseley - Syners Hill Great Mill (SJ671018)

Windmill working in 1776 and leased by Leonard Jennings. It was still working in 1838.

 

Broseley - Syners Hill Lesser Mill (SJ671017)

Windmill built in 1782 and still working in 1838.The lower part still remains as a ruin.

 

Bucknell - Bucknell Mill (SJ34467422)

Watermill built in the 19th Century and now converted into a house.

 

Buildwas – Buildwas Mill (SJ64060394)

Watermill built in the 19th Century.

 

Cheswardine – Chipnall Mill (SJ73603240)

Watermill that was working in 1280, 1698 and 1722. It was replaced with a three-storeyed brick watermill in the 18th Century and worked until the late 19th Century. It is now a ruin but a wooden shaft and spindle remain in position, although the metal waterwheel was removed for scrap during the Second World War.

 

Cheswardine – Ellerton Mill (SJ71372597)

Working in 1698 and 1722. It was destroyed by fire in 1780, together with a large stock of paper and rebuilt as on the gable is a date stone reading "William Chandler 1795". It is constructed from red brick on a dressed red sandstone plinth with a plain tile roof. The mill has two storeys and a loft. There is a window on the east side of the first-floor and a door on the left. On the ground floor there are two windows flanking a doorway. The northern gable end has a boarded loft door and first-floor door off-centre to the right. The southern gable end has three dovecote openings in the apex. To the west is a cast-iron overshot double-width wheel with header tank. In the early 1990s a proposal was put forward to turn the mill into a private dwelling.

 

Chetwynd - Howle Mill (SJ695235)

howle

Tower windmill built in 1845. The remains are 3 storeys high.

 

Cleobury Mortimer – Furnace Mill (SO71987652)

Watermill that was originally an ironworks producing cannon balls during the English Civil War until the parliamentarians burnt it down. It was rebuilt as a corn mill and turned into a private house in 1865. The falls, watercourse and sluices are still in position. The building, in the form of a cross, is sited below a dam which formed a pond bay that has since been filled in.

 

Cleobury North - Cleobury Mill (SO626872)

Watermill for corn that one had two waterwheels. It still has some 18th Century wooden gears and the frame of the waterwheel.

 

Cleobury North - Claybury Mill SO676758)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century.

 

Clun - Clun Green Mill (SO3088110)

Watermill of medieval date or later, of which only the pond bay and leat remain.

 

Clun - Clun Mill (SO304813)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century. Now a Youth Hostel but it retains its machinery, including a very rare and early turbine in a deep pit, three sets of millstones and a drying kiln.

 

Clun – Newcastle Mill (SO24868218)

Watermill dating from late 18th Century until mid-19th Century.

 

Condover – Condover Mill (SJ47680511)

Watermill recorded in the Domesday Book in 1086, sited on Cound Brook west of Radmore Hill 1 mile south-west of Condover village. It was known as the Old Mill in the late 14th Century and was disused by 1768. It was burnt down by sparks from a passing train in 1880.

 

Cosford – Cosford Mills (SJ78560470)

Two watermills working In 1291 at Cospeforde. An agreement dated 1517 said that “Sir John Talbott may build mills within Albrighton so that they are set over Mille broke or Clock broke at any place from the feld called the clockfeld and along the hethe called Donnyngton hethe into the grownde of the abbot of Byldewas called Cosford'”. Accounts of 1536-7 show 4d as the ground rent of a mill at Gosforde Grange. The mill has been destroyed and the area is largely overgrown. A decayed fragment of its south wall and the dam, with its inner retaining wall, is all that remains.

 

Craven Arms – Halford Mill (SO43638324)

Watermill for corn on the River Onny, working in the 19th Century but closed in 1925. Now used for storage.

 

Diddlebury - Bache Mill (SO502861)

Windmill built in the early 19th Century and working until the 1880s.

 

Diddlebury – Corn Mill (SO501861)

Watermill shown on 1884 map as a working corn mill.

 

Ditton Priors - Hillside Mill (SO593877)

ditton priors

Tower windmill working between 1845-1883. The remains have been preserved.

 

Donnington – Donnington Wood Mill (SJ698125)

   

Steam-operated mill for corn built in 1818. It is four storeys high and closed in the 1970s. Wheat was brought to here along the Shrewsbury Canal and in fact the traffic to this mill was the only thing that kept the canal open towards the end. The last journey on the canal before it closed in 1921 was 18 tons of wheat carried in 4 tub-boats. The building has now been converted into flats.

 

Eardington – Daniel’s Mill (SO71789174)

L254700

Watermill that is at least 300 years old and still has an iron waterwheel cast at Coalbrookdale in 1850. It is the largest waterwheel of any surviving water-powered mill in England, at 38ft 10 inches in diameter, and it drives 3 pairs of French Burr stones for grinding corn.

 

Easthope – Easthope Mill (SO56889461)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century and closed in 1926.

 

Ellesmere - Mereside Mill (SJ40733421)

Windmill advertised in the Salopian Journal of April 1803 as being to let, having three pairs of stones and near the canal. Also advertised in the Shrewsbury Chronicle of April 1814 as being to let. It was still in use in 1908.

 

Great Chatwell - Chadwell Mill (SJ786145)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century. Millpond still exists and mill has been converted into a dwelling.

 

Hadley - Hadley Park Mill (SJ677135)

telfordhadley

Tower windmill built in 1787 . Some sources believe that it was worked by both wind and water. Now converted into a house and castellated.

 

Hadnall - Waterloo Mill (SJ523210)

hadnall

Tower windmill built in 1787. Now converted into a 2 storey house.

 

Harley - Harley Court Mill (SJ597018)

Windmill built in 1808 and demolished in 1960.

 

Harmer Hill - Shotton Farm Mill (SJ496216)

Tower windmill.

 

Hodnet – Peplow Mill (SJ64282425)

Peplow_Mill_by_antiplod

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century and still working in 1963. Now converted into private house.

 

Hopesay – Aston Mill (SO38418157)

Watermill for corn and ochre working in the 19th Century.

 

Hopton Wafers – Ditton Mill (SO63567520)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century and closed in 1947.

 

Hopton Wafers – Lower Paper Mill (SO63857624)

Watermill for paper working in 1723 when the wife of the Lord of the Manor died there accidentally. One of 3 paper mills leased by Thomas Botfield  in 1816. It was abandoned in 1840 and in 1858 the mills were described as "having now fallen into disuse”.

 

Hopton Wafers – Middle Paper Mill (SO63887664)

Watermill for paper. One of 3 paper mills leased by Thomas Botfield  in 1816. It was abandoned in 1840 and in 1858 the mills were described as "having now fallen into disuse”. The remains of  two millponds are still visible.

 

Hopton Wafers – Upper Paper Mill (SO63887694)

Watermill for paper with an overshot waterwheel fed by three ponds to the north-west and a supply pond at SO63947752, with a leat on the west bank of Hopton Brook. One of 3 paper mills leased by Thomas Botfield  in 1816. It was abandoned in 1840 and in 1858 the mills were described as "having now fallen into disuse”. Traces of a leat and millpond on the brook can be found beneath dense under growth upstream of the mill site.

 

Ketley – Reynold’s Mill (SJ673107)

Tower windmill built in 1794 by William Reynolds near his ironworks. It closed sometime between 1856-1870.

 

Kynnersley – Kynnersley Mill (SJ671169)

Windmill shown on 1902 map as windmill (pumping). Must have been built after 1891 as it is not shown on the map. Only a hump remains.

 

Leegomery – Lee Mill (SJ666128)

Watermill stood on a leat by Ketley Brook that was working in 1258 when it was worth 12s. In 1842 it was driven by both steam and water but in 1912 by water alone. Flour milling ceased in 1914 but grinding for farmers continued until 1945. The buildings were gutted by fire in 1978.

 

Leighton – Leighton Mill (SJ61120580)

Watermill for corn  working in 1222 when it is mentioned by King Henry III as “a mill at Lecton”.  Listed in 1308 as one of the possessions of Leighton Manor “a Mill producing 6s 8d yearly”. The present mill building is of 18th Century brick construction but the wheel and machinery have been removed. There are no traces of the earlier mill but the large millpond almost certainly predates the present structure.

 

Lilleshall – Abbey Lower Mill (SJ726149)

Watermill for corn owned by Lilleshall Abbey that in 1634 was one of 3 mills on the stream between Lilleshall Abbey and the village. It was still working in 1805 but probably ceased soon after 1820 when the Donnington Wood Corn Mill in Wrockwardine Wood came into operation.

 

Lilleshall – Abbey Middle Mill (SJ732146)

Watermill for malt owned by Lilleshall Abbey that in 1634 was one of 3 mills on the stream between Lilleshall Abbey and the village. It had been demolished by 1804.

 

Lilleshall – Abbey Upper Mill (SJ734144)

Watermill for corn owned by Lilleshall Abbey worth 26s 8d a year in 1330 and 12s in 1353. In 1538–1539 it was leased to Thomas Fletcher and in 1634 was one of 3 mills on the stream between Lilleshall Abbey and the village. It had been demolished by 1804.

 

Lilleshall – Honnington Lower Mill (SJ715152)

Watermill recorded in the Domesday Book in 1086. The abbot of Lilleshall Abbey was fined in 1180 and 1200 for operating a mill within the royal forest. The lords of Preston and Eyton manors had permitted the abbot to make a mill and pond on Humber Brook. The pond lay immediately upstream of the crossing of the brook by the Lilleshall–Preston road. The watermill was worth 40s a year in 1330, 10s in 1353 and 53s 4d in 1375. The increase was due to a second watermill being built on the site. In 1404 both mills were leased to John the Miller and in 1428–1429 and 1436–1437 to Thomas Millward. In 1536–1537 only one water mill was working but the second  one was working again in 1538–9 when both were leased to Thomas Fletcher. John Jenckes leased them in 1637–8 and in 1580 the mill was replaced by a water-powered forge.

 

Lilleshall – Honnington Upper Mill (SJ722149)

Watermill that was working in 1717 associated with the large millpond immediately south of the Wellington–Newport road. Between 1817-1819 it was owned by Honnington Grange, who later replaced the waterwheel with a turbine.

 

Lilleshall – Village Mill (SJ7215)

Windmill working between 1775-1804 on the west side of Lilleshall village street. It was rented in 1804 by Joseph Boycott but it was called the Old Windmill in 1880. It is likely that it was less used after 1820 when the Donnington Wood Corn Mill in Wrockwardine Wood came into operation. It had been demolished by 1901.

 

Little Ness – Milford Mill (SJ41942104)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century.

 

Llaymynech – Llwyntidmon Mill (SJ29902102)

Watermill for paper on the River Morda. Probably dating from the 17th Century and extended in the mid-19th Century with later additions and alterations. Made of red brick with a slate roof and timber frame on a high rendered plinth and painted brick.

 

Longford – Longford Mill (SJ717181)

Tower Windmill that was worked by both wind and water. There is a millpond in the nearby Mill Wood at SJ716178.

 

Loppington – Brownheath Mill (SJ46263012)

Windmill built in 1808 east of the lane leading to Brownheath Moss, ¾ mile north-west of Loppington Church. It was owned by Thomas Kynaston in 1895 and still working in 1908.

 

Ludlow – Dinham Mill (SO507745)

Watermill that has been recently erected, incorporating cafe, on site of former mill. A new waterwheel generates electricity.

 

Ludlow – Fulling Mill (SO51227423)

Watermill working in the 13th Century for fulling on the River Teme. Closed in the late 19th Century.

Lydbury North – Reservoir Mill (SO345849)

Titt iron wind engine erected in 1895 at the Walcot Estate for Lord Powis. Exact location not known but possibly to top up a reservoir west of Walcot Hall.

 

Lydbury North – Well Mill (SO346850)

Titt iron wind engine erected in 1896 at the Walcot Estate for Lord Powis, replacing a steam engine. Supplied water from a well 15ft deep to a height of 84 feet. The tank was 480 yards from the wind engine.

 

Lydham – Lydham Mill (SO33519102)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century.

 

Madeley - Madeley Court Mill (SJ695053)

telfordmadeley

Tower Windmill built in 1702. The building remains but is derelict.

 

Market Drayton – Hinsley Mill (SJ686345)

Watermill at the foot of Hinsley Mill Lane working in 1601. Leased by John Parkinson in 1664-70. An old causewayed farm track across the River Tern and adjoining water meadows possibly incorporates an old millpond.

 

Market Drayton – Drayton Mill (SJ68343466)

Watermill for corn built in the late 19th Century and operated by a steam engine. It has its own wharf on the Birmingham and Liverpool Canal at SJ684347 and the “Marbury”, a traditional horse-drawn Shropshire Union Railway & Canal Company ice- breaker, is moored here.

 

Much Wenlock - Much Wenlock Mill (SJ62500082)

muchwenlock

Windmill built in 1321 may have been a predecessor of the tower Windmill built in 1714. This  is preserved as a four storey, stone rubble tapering circular tower with damaged battlemented parapet. The cap, sails and machinery have been removed.

 

Norbury - Whitcot Mill (SO377918)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century. Virtually complete with machinery, 2 pairs of stones and internal waterwheel which still works.

 

Oswestry – Maesbury Mill (SJ30312502)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century. Now milled by electricity.

 

Oswestry – Maesbury Park Mill (SJ32042507)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century.

 

Oswestry – Weston Lower Mill (SJ29652757)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century. Made of 4 storeys in roughly coursed local grey limestone blocks with yellow brick dressings. There is a slate roof with deep eaves and verges. A massive iron undershot waterwheel still in working order is housed under an arch to the rear of the adjoining mill house (The Firs) to the west.

 

Pim Hill – Fitz Mill (SJ44401806)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century.

 

Pim Hill – Mytton Mill (SJ44031757)

Watermill for corn built in 1820 and still operating in 1963.

 

Posenhall – Posenall Mill (SJ6501)

Windmill built in 1808 on the north-western edge of Posenhall. It had been demolished by 1845 .

 

Prees - Prees Mill (SJ55113361)

Watermill  and mill pond are shown on map of 1895.

 

Preston on the Weald Moors – Preston Mill (SJ6715)

Windmill recorded in 1676 as being west of village.

 

Quatt – Hampton Loade Mill (SO74848640)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century.

 

Richard’s Castle – Barrett’s Mill (SO523692)

Watermill for corn working in the 14th Century. Brick and stone foundations of the old mill survive, together with a brick floor and what looks like a mill leat.

 

Rodington – Rodington Mill (SJ590144)

Tower windmill working between 1830-1904 and truncated in 1936.

 

Ryton – Ryton Mills (SJ75930285)

Watermills for corn and paper mentioned in 1654 as "Ryton Mylnes". A lease of 1691 states "A little above the place where formerly stood a corn mill and a paper mill, both under one roof and sometime burnt down and demolished and lately erected and built above them a slitting mill and also a paper mill where the former stood". Independent operation of the two mills by separate water wheels was possible because the site was at the confluence of the Cosford Brook and River Worfe.

 

Sheriffhales – Chadwell Mill (SJ786145)

Watermill working between 1834-1866.

 

Shifnal – Hem Farm Mill (SJ73030588)

Watermill and ancillary buildings built in 1829 at Hem Farm. Now used as an agricultural store.

 

Shifnal –Hem Mill (SJ72390592)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century and closed in 1954. Now converted into a dwelling.

 

Shifnal - Upton Mill (SJ75610667)

shifnal

Tower windmill dating from later 18th Century since Windmill Inn in the adjacent village of Upton is documented in 1797. The ruins of the brick-built lower part remain up to a height of 15ft. The internal diameter is 19ft, with walls 14” thick. Two opposed doorways are visible and the walls are preserved up to two storeys in places.

 

Shipton - Broadstone Mill (SO547900)

Watermill for corn working in the 19th Century. Now converted into a dwelling.

 

Shrewsbury – Abbey Mill (SJ49751238)

Watermill that was one of 3 mills in the Abbey Foregate area in the Middle Ages. It was south of the infirmary block, on the Rea Brook.

 

Shrewsbury – Burnt Mill (SJ50411137)

Watermill that was one of 3 mills in the Abbey Foregate area in the Middle Ages. It stood on the Mill Race near Abbotsfield, on what is now the site of the Salop Steam Laundry.

 

Shrewsbury – Cole Mill (SJ48751280)

Windmill mentioned in 1437 and again in 1472 as being located between Frankwell and the river. It may have replaced an earlier one that was mentioned in 1267.

 

Shrewsbury – Ditherington Mill (SJ 49881384)

4924-0

Steam-powered mill built in 1796-97 for spinning flax yarn and twisting it into thread. It is the earliest multi-storeyed iron-framed building ever erected, being designed by Charles Bage and owned and operated by Marshall, Benyon and Bage. After its closure as a flax mill in 1886, the machinery of the mill and a bleach yard at Hanwood were sold for £3,000. The building was acquired by William Jones in 1897 and converted into a maltings, finally closing in 1986. It had its own wharf on the Shrewsbury & Newport Canal which passed next to it. It is of brick construction with a Welsh slate roof and iron-frame. The building is has five storeys and 18 bays, roofed by transverse gables and extended by additional bays to the south and north built as engine houses. Most of the windows were blocked or reduced in size on conversion to a maltings. The internal structure is iron-framed, comprising transverse cast-iron beams carried on pairs of columns on each floor and supporting shallow brick arched ceilings. Central row of columns on ground, third and fourth floors associated with power transmission from engines housed to north and south. In August 2000, funding was agreed to restore and transform the building into a mixed use shopping, heritage and leisure centre, with offices and housing.

 

Shrewsbury – Hencote Mill (SJ48451467)

Watermill working in 1180.

 

Shrewsbury - Kingsland Mill (SJ484117)

Windmill working in 1796.

 

Shrewsbury – Meole Brace Mill (SJ48861069)

Watermill for corn owned by the de Cantelow family in 1278. It was replaced at some time by a brick structure that is now used as farm buildings.

 

Shrewsbury – Monk’s Mill (SJ50311216)

Watermill (also known as Trill or Prince's Mill) that was one of 3 mills in the Abbey Foregate area during the Middle Ages. Trill Mill Lane led from Abbey Foregate to the mill on the mill race. The mill was recently demolished.

 

Shrewsbury – Sutton Mill (SJ50311075)

Watermill that was working in the 12th Century. The original wooden structure was replaced by a stone building in the 16th Century. It was converted into a forge in the 17th Century and then converted back to corn milling in the 18th Century.  There is a stone inscribed “SH 1786” which probably records the change. A mill for barium grinding was added in the 19th Century and everything was demolished in 1963.

 

Stokesay - Stokesay Castle Mill (SO437818)

Watermill for corn, probably dating from the 14th Century and after the castle was built.

 

Wellington – Bank Mill (SJ657115)

Windmill working in 1315 on the west side of Mill Lane and replaced in the 17th Century. It closed in the late 19th Century.

 

Wellington – Vineyard Mill (SJ6411)

Windmill working in 1808 near the vineyard.

 

Wem - Cotonwood Mill (SJ54163510)

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Tower windmill built in 1813 and fully working in 1903 with 4 common sails and a boat cap. Converted into a house in 1957 and now consists of a large brick tower with batter, rendered and painted white. It is four storeys high with staggered windows, conical tarred felt roof and weather vane on small flat top. It may be on the site of a previous windmill mentioned in 1281.

 

Wem – Wem Mill (SJ51202858)

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Steam mill built in the early 19th Century, probably built on the site of a medieval watermill. The original part, to the north, is 3 storeyed with 3 bays. It is brick-built on an ashlar plinth with a slate roof. The side facing the road has a central doorway to each floor with a gabled hoist house above. The large mid-19th Century extension to the south has 4 storeys and an attic, being brick-built with a tiled roof. It has 4 bays, with doorways to the far left and right on each floor. A tall square chimneystack rises on the east side.

 

Westbury - Vennington Mill (SJ337096)

Tower windmill working in 1801.

 

Weston - Hawkstone Mill (SJ56652992)

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Tower windmill built in 1808 and used for linseed oil processing. It is a large red brick tower with batter, 5 storeys high with windows on three sides. There are two doorways opposite each other and a third at first floor level. A brick shed and well are adjacent to the mill.

 

Whitton - Rockmill Mill (SO571721)

Watermill for corn in the same family ownership since 1640. Being restored and a second-hand waterwheel from Wales has been installed.

 

Whixall - Stanley Green Mill (SJ51933523)

Windmill working in 1827 on the west side of the road north of the church. It was demolished in 1930.

 

Whitchurch – Whitchurch Mill (SJ539416)

Watermill for corn on Park Lane used in the 19th Century. Now used as a creamery and painted yellow, with 2 storeys.

 

Willey – Willey Mill (SO6799)

Windmill working in 1755. There is a Pump Plantation to the north-west of the village but it is not known if it is connected.

 

Withington – Walcot Mill (SJ594123)

Watermill mentioned in 1086 as being worth 12s. It was working in 1141 and between the 16th to 18th Centuries both fulling and corn milling took place. It was rebuilt in 1761 and extended in 1886, by which time fulling had ceased. Corn milling finished in 1927 and the buildings were demolished in 1961.

 

Woore – Bearstone Mill (SJ725390)

Watermill mentioned in the Domesday Book that was converted to a forge in the late 17th Century. It was converted back for corn in the early 18th Century. The current structure has 2 storeys and the waterwheel has been restored, although all the internal machinery has been removed.

                                                                                         

Wrockwardine - Cluddley Mill (SJ631104)

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Tower windmill working in 1752 and 1827. A steam-driven mill was built next to it at a later date. Possibly built on the site of an earlier windmill that was destroyed in 1349.

 

Wroxeter - Charlton Hill Mill (SJ588075)

Post windmill working between 1752-1833.