Shropshire History

Coalbrookdale

Coalfield

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The steep sides of the Gorge were a natural place for exploiting numerous exposed seams of coal, Ironstone, clay, fullers earth, sandstone and limestone.  In addition, the densely wooded hillside would have provided a good supply of timber for charcoal.  Exactly when mining started in the area is not known but the Romans used coal in their underfloor heating at nearby Wroxeter.  There is evidence that they worked small coal mines near Oakengates so it seems reasonable to suppose that the Romans could also have made some attempt at mining in the Gorge. By the 13-14th Centuries, mining was well established in the area.  The first reference was in 1250 when Philip de Benthall granted the Buildwas monks a right of way over his land to carry coal and Ironstone.  Since mining began to deplete the local forests of timber, a proclamation was made in 1308 banning the use of coal as a fuel.  This doesn't appear to have been strictly obeyed since 14 years later Wenlock Priory granted a license "for the digging of coles at the Brocholes (Madeley)".  The monastic settlements of Wombridge Priory, Buildwas Abbey and Much Wenlock were amongst early exploiters of the local mineral resources.  The Buildwas monks operated a system whereby people who worked for them could cover their debts to the Abbey, such as rent, by working at certain times of the day without pay.  Occasionally during periods when mines could not be worked, the miners were given a quantity of ale in lieu of pay.  This system, known as "Buildwases", carried on until the mid-19th Century. 

 

By the 16th Century, there was widespread mining of Ironstone to feed the growing number of furnaces in the area.  In 1535, Wombridge Priory earned £5 per year from one of their mines and in 1541 Wenlock Priory had an Iron mine valued at £2 6s 1d.  James Clifford, Lord of the Manor of Broseley and owner of the Boat Leasow Mine, was ordered in 1575 to remove rubbish and stone that he had thrown into the deepest part of the River Severn from his "coaldelf at a place called the Tuckeyes".  This mine is known to have worked for almost 300 years but was capped and built over by Maws & Co when they constructed their works at Jackfield.  By the 17th Century, the coalfield was the second most important coal mining district in the country.  It produced 95% of all the coal mined in Shropshire and was only surpassed in output by the North-East Coalfield.  Despite this, it only covers about 24 square miles in area from the Severn to Shifnal and Wellington to Bridgnorth.  Prior to Abraham Darby's success in smelting Iron using coked coal in 1709, the most important mineral was Ironstone for use in charcoal fired blast furnaces.  At this time, coal was mostly used for the brick and tile industries and for export. As industrialisation of the Gorge began after 1709, there came an unprecedented demand for coal, Iron and limestone.  Limestone came from mines at Steeraway, The Hatch, Little Wenlock, Lilleshall and Church Aston, coal and Iron were mined all along the Gorge and clay was mined south of the River Severn.  During this period, large companies were formed and the coalfield was eventually divided up between the Madeley Wood Company in the south and the Lilleshall Company in the north.

 

The early mines were opened as adits or drift mines, tunnels driven into the side of a valley following a workable seam.  A local name for these was "footrids", although some Broseley people call a clay level a "Stocking of Clay".  Until recent years, the entrances to several footrids were open near the picnic site on the Broseley side of the Iron Bridge.  One of these was unusual in that the entrance was supported by steel girders.  These were all collapsed in the 1970s during landscaping operations and only shallow trench-like depressions remain near the path on the Benthall Edge Nature Trail. Attempts by the Shropshire Caving & Mining Club to explore adits in the Gorge have often been thwarted by bad air.  This can be methane (fire damp) in coal levels or carbon dioxide (black damp) in clay or Ironstone levels.  Hydrogen sulphide (stink damp) is often found where there is natural bitumen or tar deposits.  The term "damp" is an obsolete term for gas but it is still used in mining circles.  Concentrations of these gases build up in the old workings and the casual visitor should not explore mines since it might prove fatal. The late Alderman T Jones (a Broseley mining entrepreneur) used to recall how the Red Church Pennystone Pit, a local Iron mine, was plagued with black damp.  The miners claimed that it was "damper" when the wind was from the south and on one occasion the fireman inspected the mine on two consecutive days and declared it "unsafe to work due to damp".  On the third day the fireman looked at the church weather cock and decided that it wasn't worth inspecting the mine since the wind was shown as blowing from the south.  What he didn't know was that two miners had climbed the tower and wedged the weather cock in position, the pit was off work a week before they were found out!

 

To overcome ventilation problems in long levels, shafts were often dug higher up the hill to help create a through draught.  These could also be used as an emergency escape route if the main level collapsed.  If the material had to be taken up the hill it could be wound up the shaft in a basket or "kibble".  In shallow pits, the winding gear would be a simple hand-operated windlass called a "jackroller" or "jinny".  Sometimes the rope was not completely wound onto the drum but only had a few turns around it, a counterweight then balancing the weight of the kibble.  The last windlass of this type was used until 1964 at Rock Mine but it has not survived.  There is still a wooden jackroller over the escape shaft of Gitchfield Pit at Jackfield. Rope used on early windlasses was made of hemp but this tended to break when wet.  To help preserve ropes, they were coated in local tar which was often found oozing from tunnel walls, such as can still be seen at the Tar Tunnel at Coalport.  In later years, locally made chains were used and then wire ropes.  The rope on the drum at Gitchfield is a wire rope with a hemp core, this makes it more flexible and allows it to be wound onto a smaller diameter drum.

 

 

Gitchfield Mine was typical of hundreds of "footrids".  It was driven in 1891 to provided clay for the Coalport Tileries.  The area is now the Coalport sewage works and the adit entrance no longer exists, although water coming out of the level has been used as a water supply for the works.  It closed in the 1950s and its method of operation was the same as many small mines in the area.  Material cut at the face was pulled by children on wooden sleds (known as "mobbies") to the main roadways, where it was transferred to wagons (known as "dans") that were pulled out of the mine by horses.  Girls were used for this job until the 1844 Mines Act, after which only boys were used.  In 1892, the 13 year old W Yates of Madeley started work at Gitchfield as a "mobbier".  During a working day he would crawl on his hands and knees pulling 2 sleds at a time behind him.  The haulage chain or rope from the sleds was attached to a metal D-ring on a thick leather belt, which was worn tightly around the waist to prevent chaffing.  As the D was worn at the front, with the chain passing between the legs, the excessive loads they pulled meant that by their 20s they would often suffer from severe hip and leg displacement.  An example of a "mobbie" and harness can be seen at the Ironbridge Gorge Museum. In deep pits where the loads were quite heavy, horse powered "gins" (short for engine) were used and there were two types used locally.  The "gear pit" system was the most simple with the horse attached directly to the load and made to walk away from the shaft.  This had its drawbacks for, if the horse lost its footing, it could be dragged back towards the shaft.  The more complex "gin pit" involved one or two horses being used to turn a large horizontal wooden drum, from which the rope ran to the shaft over rollers.  Due to the abundance of wood and cheap operating costs, gins were quite a popular winding technique for shafts between 100-300ft deep.  When a horse gin was erected at a new mine, it was the custom to hold a "gin rearing" party with free ale, bread and cheese being supplied by the landowner.  The last "gin rearing" was held in 1910.  Remains of gins could be found at Deep Pit, Broseley and Lightmoor near Madeley as recently as the 1940s and one was still working near Madeley until 1948.

 

 


Although old methods survived in the coalfield until relatively modern times, it would be wrong to think that the mine owners and industrialists in this area were slow to implement new ideas.  One of the most important innovations of the area in the 17th Century was the development of the longwall system of mine working.  This replaced the earlier pillar and stall system where only about 30% of the seam was removed, the remainder being left to support the roof and reinforce the floor.  The longwall system, or "Shropshire Method" as it became known, rapidly spread to other mining areas as it allowed almost all of a seam to be removed as workings advanced from or (as in modern pits) retreated towards the shaft bottom.  The space left behind by mining is known as the "gob" or "goaf" and it is packed with waste rock and left to collapse. In a private garden on the hillside above Ironbridge, is a 50 yard long brick lined adit into an old Iron mine.  It worked the Crawstone Ironstone using the longwall system over 150 years ago but in an unusual way.  The miners started at the centre and then worked outwards, using sandstone packs to support the roof, creating an ever expanding circular longwall.  This mine is now too dangerous to explore due to gas. John Wilkinson, a local Ironfounder, invented the first coal cutting machine in 1780.  The "Iron Man" was introduced to the Broseley mines where it cut down the side of the coal after it had been undercut.  The machine worked very well in the thicker seams but the miners saw it as a threat to their jobs.  They refused to set roof supports for the machine, claiming that "if the Iron men can do one job they can do the other". The first atmospheric steam engine in Shropshire was erected at the Madeley Glebe coalworks about 1719, only 7 years after Newcomen's first engine was installed at Dudley.  This and other early engines were used for pumping water, allowing deeper seams to be worked.  Water was always a problem in the Coalbrookdale Coalfield and a miner who worked at Granville Colliery in the 1920s recalled working in a 3ft seam with 6-9" of water in it.  The  seam was so wet that it was like working in a permanent shower, sometimes if the "rain" was very bad they would be allowed to leave an hour or so earlier.  During the 1940s he was paid an extra 2/- per day for wet working. 

 

One tradition in the area was that of the "chartermaster", who acted as a labour subcontractor to the owner.  Many of these owned "tommy shops" from where miners under their employment were expected to buy their goods, often at inflated prices for poor quality.  This tradition survived into the present century and the last chartermaster retired from Granville Mine in 1913. There is a description of chartermasters in 1869 “I should tell you that in Shropshire the owner of the mine contracts with one or more men, who usually have themselves been originally working miners, to take the coal at so much per ton, these men are called chartermasters and they in their turn agree with working men at so much a day. These chartermasters looking after the men to see that they do a fair days labour, by experience they soon arrive at the knowledge how much coal under each set of special conditions the men can fairly excavate in 12 hours, this quantity is called a day's work and if a man be willing to work on for the remainder of the day he is paid extra in so much more as he can "get". The general superintendent is the engineer who looks after the safety of the system of ventilation, the machinery, the sufficiency of the materials used in propping and the chartermasters are expected to attend to the general safety of the miners, to supply tools, candles and all the appliances for winning the coal, if anything in the mine should seem wrong to the men they could directly call the attention of the chartermaster to the same and if he did not see to it, they would then call in the owner, who would send the chief superintendent”.

 

Large firms with several adjacent mines would often erect central pumping engines to drain them all.  The Lilleshall Company on the northern side of the coalfield drained Muxton Bridge, Waxhill Barracks and Barnyard Collieries through a shaft at Muxton which pumped 9,350 gallons per hour.  In the Severn Gorge at least two central engines existed.  The Madeley Wood Company had an engine pumping at The Lloyds and, on the other side of the river at the Tuckies, an engine was installed about 1780 to drain several mines including Boat Leasow Mine.  The Tuckies engine house still survives, although it was converted into a dwelling in the 1840s with an adjoining house added in the 1880s.  During alterations in 1983, the joists of the first floor were found to have curved cut-outs in the middle where they had once supported the steam cylinder.  The second floor joists were very thick and had obviously been the original beam floor, with the one end wall about 3ft thick that had supported the engine's beam.  The 150ft deep pumping shaft was still open, although covered with a concrete slab and a garden shed. In the early years, it was customary to give injured miners the job of tending the steam pumping engines.  As winding engines began to be introduced in the 1780s to wind material and men, the job of attending these was usually given to a more "respected and sober" person.  Once someone was appointed to the job of winding engineman, it was usually passed down from father to son.  Men were initially wound up and down the shaft in a kibble or by "riding the chain" - hanging onto loops fitted to the wrought Iron winding chain.  These chains were made locally and, after 1810, were typically made of three parallel lengths of chain keyed together with wooden pegs. 

 

 


Shropshire was noted for its use of winding chain despite the introduction of flat wire ropes in the 1840s.  Local chain makers did not switch to wire rope making until after several fatal shaft accidents. Despite this, many local pits carried on using chain well into this century. Coal production reached a peak in 1871 when over 1 million tons were produced in Shropshire, Iron production peaking two years later.  By the beginning of the century, however, many of the mines were worked out and began to close. Coal mines were nationalised in 1947 and compensation was paid to the private owners. At that time, only 3 deep collieries were still at work at Kemberton, Grange and Granville. In 1979, Granville Colliery (which by then had merged with Grange) finally closed and with it came the end of deep coal mining in Shropshire.  It is estimated that the Coalbrookdale Coalfield still contain 120 million tons of coal. Today it is more economical to opencast and this is currently being done around Telford for coal and fireclay.
Although this coalfield did not have the big mining disasters that other areas did, thousands of lives have been lost from "minor" accidents, such as roof falls, fires, accumulations of gas, people falling down shafts or winding accidents.  One sad tale concerned a young engaged girl who was picking Ironstone nodules on a tip in Donnington Wood.  Another girl asked her where the wedding reception was to be held and she replied "In Hell".  On that note, she lost her footing and fell down a mine shaft.  Even when the mines closed they were still dangerous and there have been several cases of children falling down old shafts or unwary explorers entering old adits and being overcome by gas.  The coal, Iron and clay deposits were so closely intermingled that it was very rare for only one of them to be mined. What tended to happen was that one of them would be the main output but the other deposits would also be extracted as a byproduct. Horizontal workings were usually called a mine or adit.  Small coal or Iron mines accessed by a shaft were usually called a pit. Larger coal mines especially those with steam engines, were called a colliery.

 

Where there is a lot of information, follow the link to another page.

 

1800 Tunnel, Ironbridge (SJ668036)

Access Tunnel

 

Adams Pit, Madeley Wood (SJ6804)

Iron

There is a drawing of the mine in 1847 showing women picking ironstone nodules from the tips.

 

Albion Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

                                                                   

Alders Meadow Mine, Jackfield (SJ682029)

Red Clay  (aka Doughty’s)

 

Amies Field Pit, Broseley (SJ6901)

Coal

                                                                   

Arleston Colliery, Arleston (SJ665100)

Coal, Fireclay, Red Clay, Iron

In 1945 it was owned by the Wrekin Coal Co Ltd and was worked together with Lawley Nos 3-4 Pits and Lawley Drift Extension. In total there were 25 men working underground and 6 on surface.

 

Arleston Level, Arleston (SJ6610)

Drainage Level

                                                                   

Ash Coppice Pit, Broseley (SJ6901)

Coal

                                                                   

Ash Tree Pit, Dawley (SJ668071)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Astleyfields Colliery, Broseley (SJ678025)

Coal

 

Bailey’s Pit, Mossey Green (SJ6809)

Coal

 

Ball’s Pit, Hadley (SJ6712)

Coal, Iron

 

Bank’s Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal, iron

 

Banker Pit, Ketley Bank (SJ6810)

Coal

 

Baptist Lane Pit, Dawley (SJ6808)

Coal

 

Barker’s Yard Pit, Dawley (SJ606)

Coal, Iron

 

Barn Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Barnet's Leasow Pit, Broseley (SJ676027)

Coal

                                                                   

Barnyard Colliery, Donnington (SJ719126)

Coal

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 61 men working underground and 19 on the surface.

 

Barracks Colliery, Donnington (SJ718129)

See Waxhill Barracks

                                                                   

Baugh's Pit, The Lloyds (SJ682034)

Coal

Mentioned in a lease in 1840 as “John Baugh's Penny Pit”. William Baugh was a Chartermaster in Madeley in 1791 and Baugh's occupied 7 plots on the 1847 Tithe Map. The mine closed in the 1840s and until recently was covered with a brick bee-hive covering.

                                                                   

Bedlam Adits, Ironbridge (SJ678034)

Iron

Situated at the foot of the high wall west of the Bedlam Furnace site and believed to be in the Crawstone Ironstone seam. Any workings will almost certainly have been disturbed by a landslip above.

 

Bedlam Pit, The Lloyds (SJ682033)

Coal

A pumping engine was erected here in the 1790s.

 

Bell’s Rough Pit, Broseley (SJ6801)

Coal

 

Bellam Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6507)

Coal

                                                                   

Belle Vue Pit, Oakengates (SJ697113)

Coal, Fireclay

 

Bennett’s Pit, Old Park (SJ6909)

Coal, Iron

                                                                                       

Benthall Fireclay Mine, Broseley (SJ6602)

Coal, Fireclay

In 1896, the owner was fined £1 with 9/-- costs for failing to keep a mine plan and a similar amount for failing to provide a second means of egress. In 1945 it was owned by the Benthall Fireclay Co Ltd and had 5 men working underground and 1 on the surface.

                                                                   

Benthall Lane Mine, Ironbridge (SJ6603)

Fireclay

                                                                   

Benthall Mine, Broseley (SJ6602)

Coal, Fireclay

 

Benthall Limepit, Benthall (SJ6703)

Limestone

                                                                   

Benthall Pottery Clay Mine, Broseley (SJ6602)

Red Clay

 

Benthall Sandstone Mine, Benthall (SJ6703)

Sandstone, Tar

                                                                   

Benthall White Mine, Broseley (SJ6602)

Fireclay

                                                                   

Bentley Level, Ironbridge (SJ6703)

Red Clay

 

Best Fireclay Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Fireclay

 

Birch Meadow Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Bird’s Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal  (aka Burd’s)

 

Bitumen Well, Pitchford (SJ529042)

Tar

Well in the grounds of Pitchford Hall that oozes bitumen.

 

Black Hill Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal

 

Blackstone Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Blists Hill Pit, Madeley (SJ694034)

Red Clay  

Owned by the Madeley Wood Company. In 1896, the manager was J Raspass with 12 men working underground and 2 on the surface. One of the last winding enginemen at Blists Hill Mine (now reconstructed by Ironbridge Gorge Museum) was Frank Turner who recorded his memories as follows :-

 

“So much has been said and written recently about the history of the Blists Hill Mine that I feel urged to set down my own recollections. I was winding-engineman there from 3rd January, 1935 until 26th February, 1940. It closed soon afterwards. For the first fifteen months of working there I lived in Much Wenlock. I used to cycle to work, leaving Much Wenlock at 5.40 a.m. I travelled along the Barrow Road, passing the Round House, and arrived at Broseley Church about 6.00 a.m. Continuing down the Broseley Road I went around the S-bend, over the Free Bridge and along the Lloyds, coming out into the Coalport Road. My favourite journey was to turn right below Broseley Cemetery, go down through the Dingle, and arrive at Coalport Memorial bridge; crossing over the bridge, I usually travelled up the Coalport Road. Occasionally I walked up the Incline-, at this particular time you could cycle along the path at the side of the canal.

 

I arrived at the Mine about 6.20 a.m. My stoker started work at 6.00a.m. to get the boiler in working order, so that I could have a supply of steam by 6.25 a.m., which was my time for starting work. Every morning, by law, the winding engine was run, the empty cage travelling to the bottom of the shaft and then brought back to the surface again. While the cage was travelling in the shaft the banksman inspected the winding rope, etc. During this time I checked the machinery for any faults, and, everything being in safe working order, the daily report book was signed. We then proceeded to lower the miners down the shaft: the colliery manager and the onsetter went down first, then the miners. Six miners at a time got in the cage, which was fastened by a gate on each side. The miners were all down by 6.55 a.m., which was their time for starting work. We started to wind clay immediately the miners were down.

 

For lighting during the winter and on dark mornings, I had a small paraffin lamp, which shone on the winding indicator. At the top of the pit the banksman hung a large paraffin lamp on the pit frame to light the miners. This, however was not much use to the engineman when it was foggy, and at times I have been days without seeing the top of the pit, due to the fog. To give you an idea how much clay was wound up the pit: in 1935 I wound 13,185 tubs, each tub of clay averaging 12 to 15 cwt. There was not only the winding of clay to be considered; there was also the water pit. This pit was deeper than the clay pit in order to drain the water from the workings into the water pit sump. There was a considerable amount of water raised, particularly during the winter. During the week I regularly worked over until 6.00 p.m. to get the water down to a level of safety; and until 4.30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

 

I did my own maintenance work, which included packing the cylinder glands, fitting new joints in the main delivery steam pipe and adjusting the two winding ropes to suit the stroke of the winding engine. The big jobs, such as capping the winding ropes and. putting new rope on, were done on a week end. Each day after the work was done, the banksman prepared for the next day. He went along to a building which was situated at the side of the canal and used as a stores for powder, detonators, candles, etc. He would then put ready for the next morning everything that the miners would need. Incidentally, the main powder magazine was situated on the side of the bank, on the other side of the canal. The last thing I did before leaving for home was to lift into the engine house the framed plan of the mine, which I hung outside the engine house each morning. I then put shutters up to the winding house window, and locked up for the night.

 

SJ69450345

Winding engine house (C19)

SJ695035

Shaft (capped)

 

Blue Flat Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

Boat Leasow Pit, Broseley (SJ6902)

Coal

 

Bonny Pit, Jackfield (SJ6809027)

see Wallace Pit

                                           

Borough Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal, Fireclay  (aka Council)

In 1945 it was owned by the London Fields Colliery Co Ltd and there were 8 men working underground and 2 on the surface.

 

Botany Bay Pit, Dawley (SJ689060)

Coal

                                                                   

Bottomcoal Pit, Broseley (SJ680019)

Coal

 

SJ68130200

Powder house (C19)

SJ68080105

Shaft (capped)

 

Boundary Pit, Wombridge (SJ6912)

Coal

 

Bowen & Buckley’s Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

 

Bower Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, Red Clay

                                                                   

Brandlee Drift, Horsehay (SJ678074 )

Coal

                                                                   

Brandlee Pits, Horsehay (SJ678076)

Coal, Fireclay

There were 6 pits called Brandlee Pit No 1, etc. Recorded output 1937-1946 was :-

 

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

3,517

4,786

2,485

2,721

1,404

3,593

5,008

2,402

2,188

2,649

30,753

 

In 1945 it was owned by J Smallshaw and there were 18 men working underground and 5 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised but in 1949 it was handed back to J Smallshaw, with 19 men underground and 4 on surface. At that time they were working the Church and Little Flints Seams.  It closed in 1956.

 

Brick Kiln Leasow Pit, Ironbridge (SJ683042)

Coal

A pumping engine was erected here in 1794 with another shortly after. In 1864, 9 miners died when the chains became unhooked as the men were ascending the shaft.

                                           

Brickyard Pit, Donnington (SJ710129)

Coal

 

Bridge Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Broad Meadow Pit, Broseley (SJ6801)

Coal

 

Broseley Hill Mine, Broseley (SJ6802)

Red Clay

 

Broseley Limepit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Limestone

 

Broseley Mine, Broseley (SJ6702)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Broseley Wood Mine, Broseley (SJ675026)

Red Clay  (aka Broseley Wood Green)

 

Broseley Wood Green Mine, Broseley (SJ6702)

See Broseley Wood Mine

                                                                   

Buckatree Pit, New Works (SJ662081)

Coal

 

Bunter’s Row Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Burd’s  Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

See Bird’s

 

Bye Pit, Wombridge (SJ6911)

Coal

 

Cadman’s Pit, Old Park (SJ6909)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Calcutts Pit, Ironbridge (SJ6802)

Red Clay

It was recorded as working in 1588 and again in 1676.

                                                                   

Cape Pit, The Lloyds (SJ689029)

Coal

There was a pumping engine here in 1790.

 

Castle Pit, Dawley (SJ6806)

Coal, iron

 

Castle Green Pit, Coalbrookdale (SJ6704)

Coal

 

Castle Yard Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal, Iron

 

Cat’s Head Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

                                                                   

Caughley Pit, Broseley (SJ696007)

Coal

 

Caughley Limepits, Broseley (SJ6801)

Limestone

                                                                   

Chapel Pit, Dawley (SJ681083)

Coal

 

Charles Hay Pit, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal, Iron

 

Cherry Tree Hill Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Red Clay

 

Chimney Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

Church Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Churms Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6507)

Coal

 

Clare’s Lane Pit, Mossey Green (SJ6809)

Coal

 

Clay’s Pit, Ironbridge (SJ6803)

Coal

 

Cliff Pit, Wellington (SJ6809

Coal

                                                                   

Coalbrookdale Pit, Wellington (SJ6704)

Coal

                                                                   

Coalmoor Pits, Horsehay (SJ664065)

Coal Fireclay

There were 9 pits called Coalmoor Pit No 1, etc.

 

Coalmoor Farm Pit, Coalmoor (SJ6607)

Coal

 

Coalmoor Grenfield Pit, Coalmoor (SJ6607)

Coal

 

Coalport Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Cockshutt Pit, Broseley (SJ6702)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

 

Cold Oak Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Colley’s Dingle Pit, Broseley (SJ6601)

Coal

 

Common Colliery, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal

Recorded output 1936-1946 was :-

 

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

4,423

6,308

7,731

5,255

4,814

5,450

5,422

7,122

6,819

3,745

3,325

60,444

 

In 1945 it was owned by the Common Colliery Co (Dawley) Ltd and had 19 men working underground and 6 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised but in 1949 it was handed back to the company, with 12 men underground and 3 on surface. At that time they were working the Clod, New Mine and Randle Seams.  It closed in 1956.

 

Common Pit, Horsehay (SJ673079)

see Horsehay Common

                                                                   

Coneybury Pit, Broseley (SJ684018)

Coal  (aka Conisbury)

It had closed by 1896.

 

Conisbury Pit, Broseley (SJ684018)

See Coneybury Pit.

 

Cooper’s Coppice Pit, Muxton (SJ7312)

Coal

 

Coppice Level, Ironbridge (SJ6703)

Coal

 

Coppice Pit, Benthall (SJ6601)

Coal

 

Coppice Pit, Dawley (SJ6909)

Coal

 

Corbett’s Pit, Old Park (SJ6909)

Coal, Iron

 

Cote Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Council Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

See Borough Pit.

 

Court Field Pit, Madeley (SJ6904)

Coal

 

Cow Wood Pit, Red Lake (SJ6810)

Coal, Red Clay

                                                                   

Crawstone Level, Ironbridge (SJ671036)

Iron

An open level behind a house leads to a series of side passages which have been worked in the longwall method.  Although there is a narrow seam of coal, this mine was worked mainly for ironstone.  Due to the strata and single entrance, there is a great danger of carbon dioxide gas building up in the workings and exploration should not be attempted without some form of gas detection.

 

Crostan Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Cumberland Pit, The Lloyds (SJ681033)

Coal

A pumping engine was erected here in the 1790s.

 

Cuxey’s Wood Pit, Randlay (SJ7007)

Coal, Iron

 

Dabler’s Colliery, Horsehay (SJ6708)

Coal

 

Dairy Pit, Steeraway (SJ64280924)

Coal

The shaft is flooded.

                                                                   

Daisy Pit, Old Park (SJ6809)

Coal

There were two pits named Daisy Pit No 1 and Daisy Pit No 2.

                                                                   

Dales Pit, The Lloyds (SJ682033)

Coal

Mentioned in a lease in 1840, probably working the Pennystone Ironstone. The name “Dale” is a local family name so this may be the name of the Chartermaster. It closed in the 1840s.

                                                                   

Dark Lane Pit, Hollinswood (SJ707092)

Coal

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1862 there were fatalities in a shaft accident. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 53 men working underground and 24 on the surface.

 

Davis Pit, Old Park (SJ6909)

Coal, Iron

 

Dawley Colliery, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal

                                                                   

Dawley Bank Pit, Dawley (SJ6808)

Coal

                                                                   

Dawley Green Pit, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal

 

Dawley Old Engine Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6805)

Coal  (aka Dawley Parva)

 

Dawley Parva Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6805)

see Dawley Old Engine

                                                                                                                                         

Dawley Road Pit, Horsehay (SJ6708)

Coal

 

Day Level, Donnington (SJ6914)

Drainage Level

 

Deep Granville Colliery, Wombridge (SJ6912)

see Wombridge

                                                                   

Deep Pit, Broseley (SJ683016)

Red Clay  (aka Guest’s Deep)

                                                                   

Deepfield Pit, Dawley (SJ684064)

Coal

 

Deerleap Pit, Broseley (SJ667017)

Fireclay

 

Derbyshire Level, Ketley( SJ6811)

Drainage Level

 

Dingle Pit, The Lloyds (SJ693031)

See New Hill Pit.

 

Do Well Pit, New Works (SJ6608)

Coal, Iron

 

Dog-in-Lane Pit, Coalmoor (SJ6707)

See Wellington Road

 

Donnington Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

                                                                                       

Donnington Wood Colliery, Donnington (SJ7112)

Coal

 

Doseley Pit, Doseley (SJ6706)

Coal  (aka Doseley Bridge)

                                                                   

Doseley Bridge Pit, Doseley (SJ6706)

See Doseley

 

Double Pit, Broseley (SJ6802_

Coal

                                                                   

Doughty's Mine, Jackfield (SJ682029)

See Alders Meadow Mine

 

Drayton Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

Dryton Pit, Dryton (SJ5855063)

Coal

 

SJ58550636

Shaft (collapsed)

SJ58650635

Shaft (collapsed)

SJ58700611

Shaft (collapsed)

SJ58700655

Shaft (collapsed)

                                                                   

Dunge Clay Mine, Broseley (SJ684013)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Dunge Fireclay Mine, Broseley (SJ680010)

Coal, Fireclay

At the Petty Sessions of December 15th 1906 Samuel Davies, manager of the Dunge Coalpit, was charged with a breach of the Coal Mines Regulation Act by unlawfully permitting certain persons to be in the mine for the purpose of employment therein whilst there were not two shafts or outlets.  Mr Ashwell, who appeared for the inspector of mines, said that the defendant was liable to a penalty of £20. The defendant pleaded guilty and was fined £5 17s, including costs, in default of which his goods would be sold or he would receive one month's imprisonment.

 

Edward’s Piece Pit, Hadley (SJ6712)

Coal

                                                                   

Ercall View Pit, Lawley (SJ6708)

Coal, Iron

 

Exley’s Mine, Coalport (SJ707014)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Fair Lady Pit, Ketley Bank (SJ6810)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Fair View Pit, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal

                                                                   

Fair View Pit, Lawley (SJ6708)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

 

Fair View Pit, Red Lake (SJ6810)

Coal, Red Clay

 

Fairfield Pit, Lawley (SJ6809)

Coal

                                           

Farm Pit, Lawley Bank (SJ6808)

Coal

Recorded output 1938-1946 was :-

 

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

675

2,327

816

1,595

2,028

675

4,400

5,061

5,680

23,257

 

In 1945 it was owned by J Smallshaw & G Tarr and there were 23 men working underground and 7 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised and the owner at that time was Farm Lane (Lawley Bank) Colliery Ltd. In 1949 it was handed back to J Smallshaw & G Tarr, with 19 men underground and 4 on surface. At that time they were working the Double Seam.  It closed in the 1950s.

                                                                   

Ferriday’s Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 7 men working underground and 3 on the surface.

 

Fiery Fields Pit, Broseley (SJ6801)

Coal

                                                                   

Fish House Pit, Broseley (SJ677025)

Coal

 

Fletcher & Jones’ Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal

 

Forge Pit, Hinkshay (SJ6907)

Coal

 

Forge Meadow Pit, Old Park (SJ6907)

Coal, Iron

 

Foster’s Pit, Halesfield (SJ7005)

Coal

 

Foxholes Wood Pit, Ironbridge (SJ6603)

Coal

                                                                   

Freehold Colliery, Donnington (SJ717134)

Coal, Iron

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. Details from the mineral statistics are :-

 

Year

Manager

Men Underground

Men

Surface

1896

Noel Beech

29

11

1923

S Champion-Jones

264

50

 

It was closed in 1928.

 

Furnace Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

 

Gallear’s Pit, Lawley (SJ6608)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Garden Pit, Wellington (SJ6707)

Coal

                                                                   

Gas Works Pit, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal

                                                                   

Gitchfield Level, Coalport (SJ707014)

Red Clay

in 1949 it was owned by William Exley & Sons, with 3 men working underground and none on the surface.

 

SJ70320137

Wooden windlass (C20)

SJ705015

Shaft (flooded)

SJ70320137

Shaft (flooded)

 

Gladstone Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal

                                                                   

Good Hope Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6506)

Coal

in 1949 it was owned by H Pitt & Co Ltd, with 9 men working underground and 3 on the surface. At that time it was working the Fireclay, Clunch and New Mine Seams.

                                                                   

Good Hope Pit, Madeley (SJ7004)

Coal, Fireclay

In 1945 it was owned by H S Pitt & Co Ltd and there were 10 men working underground and 3 on the surface. The company were still operating in 1947.

                                                                   

Grange Colliery, Donnington (SJ721114)

Coal, Iron  (aka Watling Street Grange)

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. Details from the Mineral Statistics are :-

 

Year

Manager

Men Underground

Men

Surface

1896

Noel Beech

239

60

1923

S Champion-Jones

142

44

1933

110

31

1940

111

30

1947

C Machin

110

32

1949

M McGugan

101

38

 

In 1945 it was owned by the Lilleshall Co Ltd and there were 109 men working underground and 42 on the surface. In 1949 they were working the New Mine Seam. A roadway was driven to connect Granville and Grange collieries underground. After merging, the shafts at Grange were used for ventilation, emergency means of egress and for training purposes. It was regarded as somewhat of a primitive mine by some miners for having flat ropes. It closed in 1979.

 

SJ721114

Tandem Headgear (C20)

SJ721114

Shaft (filled)

 

Granville Colliery, Donnington (SJ724120)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Gravel Leasow Pit, Lightmoor (SJ679055)

Red Clay

 

Green’s  Mine, Broseley (SJ6801)

Red Clay

 

Greenfield Pit, Wrockwardine Wood (SJ7011)

Coal, Fireclay

in 1949 it was owned by H Price & Co Ltd, with 3 men working underground and 2 on the surface. At that time it was working the Fireclay Seam.

 

Greyhound Pit, Priorslee (SJ6910)

Iron

 

Grimber’s  Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6705)

Coal

 

Groucott’s Pit, Mossey Green (SJ6809)

Coal

 

Guest’s Deep Pit, Broseley (SJ683016)

see Deep

                                                                                                                                         

Guy’s Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

 

Gypsy Lane Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Hadley Colliery, Hadley (SJ6811)

Coal

                                                                   

Halesfield Colliery, Madeley (SJ704051)

Coal  (aka Madeley Wood)

Sunk in the 1920s by the Madeley Wood Co Ltd.  Details from the Mineral Statistics are :-

 

Year

Manager

Men Underground

Men

Surface

1923

S Bridges

17

4

1933

J Stephenson

4

4

1940

J Worthington

4

4

 

It was joined underground to Kemberton in 1939 and was used thereafter for pumping, ventilation and emergency egress. The mine closed in 1967 when Kemberton Colliery became uneconomic.

 

SJ713055

Pit head baths (C20)

SJ713055

Canteen (C20)

SJ713055

Office (C20)

 

Hall Pit, Old Park (SJ697091)

Coal

 

Hangman’s Hill Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

 

Harris’ Pit, Oakengates (SJ6809)

see Old Park

                                                                   

Hatch Level, Wellington (SJ644083)

Limestone                      

Closed in 1918.

                                           

Haughton's Mine, Jackfield (SJ6802)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Haycop Pit, Broseley (SJ679018)

Coal  (aka Haycop Hill)

 

Haycop Hill Pit, Broseley (SJ679018)

See Haycop Pit

 

Heath Hill Pit, Dawley (SJ678078)

Coal

 

Herman’s Field Pit, Broseley (SJ683016)

see Deep

                                                                                                                                         

Hill Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

see Wombridge Hill

                                                                                                                                         

Hillcrest Pit, Wellington (SJ6809)

Coal

                                                                   

Hills Lane Pit, Madeley (SO701043)

Iron

The Wellington Journal & Shrewsbury News of December 7th 1895 recorded that “The men working at Hill's Lane Claypit have received a fortnight's notice, which expires to-day. If this pit, of which Mr M Owen is manager, be closed, several hands will be thrown out of employment”. It was owned by the Madeley Wood Company and in 1896 it was recorded as “standing”.

                                                                   

Hillside Pit, Lawley Bank (SJ6808)

Coal

 

Hilltop Farm Level, Broseley (SJ6602)

Coal

                                                                   

Hinkshay Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal

                                                                   

Holley Grove Level, Jackfield (SJ6703)

Red Clay

                                                                                                                                         

Holly Bush Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal

 

Holmes & Daintie’s Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

 

Holyhead Pit, Oakengates (SJ6711)

Coal

 

Holywell Pit, Malinslee (SJ6908)

Coal, Iron

 

Hopley’s Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Horse Leasow Pit, Wellington (SJ6809)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Horsehay Pit, Dawley (SJ6707)

Coal

                                                                   

Horsehay Common Pit, Horsehay (SJ673079)

Coal, Fireclay  (aka Common)

 

Horton Pit, Donnington (SJ7112)

Coal, Iron

 

Huntington Colliery, New Works (SJ662078)

See New Works Colliery

 

Hydraulic Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

                                                                   

Imperial Clay Mine, Ironbridge (SJ677035)

Red Clay

 

Inett’s Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

                                                                   

Ivy Pit, Mossy Green (SJ6810)

Coal

Closed in 1936.

 

Jackey Pit, Mossey Green (SJ6809)

Coal

Closed in 1914.

                                                                   

Jackfield Pit, Jackfield (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Jerry’s Pit, Malinslee (SJ6908)

Coal, Iron

 

Jervis Pit, Donninton (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

John Howle’s Pit, Coalport (SJ6903)

Coal

 

Jolly Pit, Jackfield (SJ6809027)

see Wallace

                                                                                                                                         

Jones & Barker’s Pit, Malinslee (SJ6908)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Jubb's Leasow Pit, Dawley (SJ679054)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Jubilee Mine, Broseley (SJ6802)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Jubilee Pit, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal

                                                                   

Kemberton Colliery, Madeley (SJ712055)

Coal, Iron

Sunk by the Madeley Wood Company in 1864 to a depth of 1,092ft. Details from the Mineral Statistics are :-

 

Year

Manager

Men Underground

Men

Surface

1896

J Raspass

235

73

1923

S Bridges

499

120

1933

J Stephenson

350

78

1940

J Worthington

380

125

1945

J Worthington

456

179

1947

Gavin Scott

440

132

1949

W Cain

440

150

 

In 1910, there was an accident in which 7 men were killed. The mine was linked to Halesfield Colliery in 1939 and the two were worked together. In 1946, the Yard Seam, Big Flint Seam and Vigar Seam were being worked. During the Second World War, output varied between 173,132 tons in 1941, 148,675 tons in 1944 and 190,000 tons in 1946. After nationalisation in 1947, the colliery prospered and the workforce increased to nearly 800. In 1949 they were working the Big Flints, Top and Vigars Yard Seams. Unfortunately, to the north-east the coal seams were being progressively cut out by Symon unconformity. This severely limited the mine's future and, with a possible north-east extension of the Coalport syncline east of the Madeley fault not proven, it closed in 1967.

 

Ketley Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal

                                                                   

Ketley Bank Pit, Ketley (SJ6910)

Coal

                                                                   

Ketley Fireclay Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Fireclay

                                                                   

Ketley Grange Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal

 

Ketley Hall Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal  (aka Ketley Manor)

 

Ketley Level, Ketley (SJ6710)

Drainage Level

 

Ketley Manor Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

See Ketley Hall

                                                                   

Ketley Quarry Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal

 

Knowle’s Mine, Jackfield (SJ6902)

Coal, Iron

 

Lady Grove Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal

                                                                   

Ladywood B & C Mine, Jackfield (SJ6703)

Coal

                                                                   

Ladywood Fireclay Level, Broseley (SJ6703)

Coal, Fireclay

 

Ladywood Level, Benthall (SJ6703)

Drainage Level

                                                                   

Ladywood Red Clay Level, Broseley (SJ679029)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Ladywood Sulphur Coal Level, Broseley (SJ6703)

Coal

                                                                   

Ladywood Top Pit, Broseley (SJ6703)

Coal

                                                                   

Lane Pit, The Lloyds (SJ6803)

Coal

A pumping engine was erected here in 1794.

 

Langford’s Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Langley Fields Pit, Dawley (SJ690073)

Coal

 

Langley Level, Dawley (SJ6907)

Drainage Level

 

Langley Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Lawley Bank Pit, Dawley (SJ6808)

Coal

                                           

Lawley Coppice Pits, Horsehay (SJ6709)

Coal

There were 8 pits called Lawley Coppice Pit No 1, etc.

                                                                   

Lawley Drift Extension, Arleston (SJ6709)

Coal, Fireclay

In 1945 it was owned by the Wrekin Coal Co Ltd and was worked together with Arleston Fireclay Pit and Lawley Nos 3-4 Pits. In total there were 25 men working underground and 6 on surface.

                                                                   

Lawley Furnace Pit, Dawley (SJ666094)

Coal

                                                                   

Lawley Pits, Dawley (SJ6708)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

There were 4 pits called Lawley Pit No 1, etc. In 1945 there were only Nos 3-4 Pits which were owned by the Wrekin Coal Co Ltd and were worked together with Arleston Fireclay Pit and Lawley Drift Extension. In total there were 25 men working underground and 6 on surface.

 

Lawley Prospect Pit, Lawley (SJ6608)

see Prospect

                                                                   

Lawn Pit, Hollinswood (SJ701090)

Coal

                                                                   

Lawn Colliery, Priorslee (SJ708097)

Coal

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 19 men working underground and 13 on the surface.

 

Legge’s Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Lightmoor Pit, Lightmoor (SJ679057)

Coal

 

Lightmoor Whimsey Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6705)

Coal, Red Clay

                                                                   

Lincoln Hill Mine, Ironbridge (SJ669038)

Limestone

Owned by the Madeley Wood Company. In 1896 there were 2 men working underground and 1 on the surface. The shaft is now filled.

                                                                   

Little Dark Lane Pit, Hollinswood   (SJ700085)

Coal

                                                                   

Little Eyton Pit, Dawley (SJ6808)

Coal

 

Little Hayes Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, iron

 

Little Lodge Bellpits, Broseley  (SJ665006)

Coal

                                                                   

Little Wenlock Pit, Horsehay (SJ6506)

Coal

                                                                   

Lloyds Clay Pit, The Lloyds (SJ685033)

Red Clay

Shown on the 1847 Tithe Map of 1847 and still working in 1882, when it was shown on the OS Map as a single shaft, connected by tramway to the Bedlam Brickworks. The mine had at least one building but may have been quite shallow since it worked the red clay. Ben Maddox was supposed to have been in an explosion here in 1880. It had closed by 1890.

                                                                   

Lloyds Crawstone Pit, The Lloyds (SJ686033)

Iron  (aka Lloyds Ironstone)

Probably sunk around 1780, when the community round was being developed. It had some early steam engines, including one in the 1840s. It closed about 1890 but may have reopened for a short period around 1900.

 

Lloyds Ironstone Pit, The Lloyds (SJ686033)

See Lloyds Crawstone Level.

 

Lloyds Pit, The Lloyds (SJ68940301)

Coal  (aka Smith’s Gin Pit,Water Engine Pit, Water Engine Air Pit)

In 1726, a pumping engine was erected at "Smiths Gin Pit” and this was the original name.  It was one of the earliest steam engines in Shropshire and possibly this was the same Smith as referred to in the “Smiths Shop” of an 1840 lease. There was a pumping engine here around 1820 because a boy named Brown accidentally caused an explosion in the offices nearby which blew out the windows. A note by the Lilleshall Company in 1836 records “Old Engine Pit in the Lloyds, Bottom (Big Flint) Coal 126ft”. There was an underground tunnel to Blists Hill Mine and presumably the engine pumped water here via flat rods, raising it up to the Tar Tunnel where it flowed out. Photos survive of a pumping engine about 1900. A Madeley Wood Company survey of 1909 records “Lloyds Water Pit surface level 180ft depth to Pennystone, 213ft to Clods”. Around 1911 the pump rods broke, causing the mine to flood and work to cease. In 1912, the engine was described as being used only for pumping. It had 3 boilers, two haystack and one egg-ended, and an open top cylinder 26" diameter with an 8ft stroke. The cast Iron beam was 20ft long and at the shaft there were two 9¾” bore working barrels working from a depth of 300ft, each barrel lifting 150ft. The equipment was said to be 115 years old, ie dating from 1797. In the 1960s, the pump rods still protruded 11ft above the shaft but are now obscured in undergrowth.

 

SJ68940301

Pump rod/balance bob in shaft (C19)

SJ68940301

Shaft (open)

 

Lloyds Stile Pit, The Lloyds (SJ681033)

See Stilehouse Pit

 

Lloyds Stile House Pit, The Lloyds (SJ681033)

See Stilehouse Pit

 

Lodge Colliery, Donnington (SJ7112)

Coal

                                                                   

Lodge Pit, Hollinswood (SJ700084)

Coal

 

Lodge Pit, Madeley (SJ6703)

Coal

                                                                   

Lodgebank Pit, Donnington (SJ7212)

Coal  (aka Slaughter)

From 1875, the colliery was called "Slaughter Pit" locally after toxic gases from an underground fire caused the death of 11 men and a horse. In 1896 it was recorded as “standing”.

 

Lodgewood Pit, Donnington (SJ7212)

Coal

 

London Fields Pit, Lawley (SJ6608)

Coal

 

Lower Brandlee Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal, Fireclay

 

Lower Hill Pit, Madeley (SJ6803)

Coal

                                                                   

Lower Lightmoor Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6705)

Fireclay

 

Lower Springs Pit, Snedshill (SJ704094)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Lower Stone Pit Tunnel, Ironbridge (SJ670037)

Access Tunnel

Like Stone Pit Tunnel, it was shown on the 1883 OS Map with a tramway and a drainage channel leading from it. It is possible that this connected with Ironstone mines and may have been covered later with spoil from Styches Pit.

 

Lydebrook Dingle Level, Coalmoor (SJ6606)

Drainage Level

 

Maddock’s Hill Mine, Steeraway (SJ6509)

Limestone

                                                                   

Madeley Court Colliery, Madeley (SJ698051)

Coal, Iron

 

Madeley Wood Colliery (SJ704051)

See Halesfield Colliery

                                                                   

Malinslee Colliery, Wellington (SJ6908)

Coal  (aka Malinslee Hall)

 

Malinslee Hall Colliery, Wellington (SJ6908)

See Malinslee

 

Mannerley Lane, Red Lake (SJ6809)

Coal

                                                                   

Marsh Mine, Broseley (SJ6702)

Red Clay

 

Maxfield Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal, Iron

 

Maypole Pit, Lawley (SJ6608)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Meadow Pit, Donnington (SJ7112)

Iron

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896 it was recorded as “standing”.

 

Meadow Colliery, Madeley (SJ690041)

Coal

This was owned by the Madeley Wood Company and mining began there in 1808. Although ironstone was also mined at this pit, only coal appears to have been mined during its last years. There were two mine shafts, 12 yards apart, and one air shaft. The top pit shaft was used for winding coal and the bottom pit shaft for winding water. Chain was used for the pit cage and a flat wire rope, approximately  5 inches wide and 1 inch thick, was attached to the water tank. When the wires in the flat rope became worn they were taken out and replaced by new ones, this being called lacing.

 

The winding engine was installed in 1918 and was a large beam engine, supplied with steam by three boilers, two Lancashire and a round-ended one fired underneath. There was a pool nearby which supplied water for these boilers and condensing water for the beam engine.  The engine worked at 5lbs steam pressure and had a very quiet exhaust but quickly brought the pit cage to the top of the shaft. This was due to the large diameter of chain on the winding spool. There was quite a large bell attached to the engine which was operated by gears, and this bell warned the engine man that the cage was approaching either the surface or the bottom of the main shaft. It could be heard all over Madeley. The ventilation in the mine was created by a large fire at the bottom of the shaft. 

 

Coal was sent from the mine in horse-drawn waggons on cast iron plateways to Blists Hill furnaces and tileries in one direction and to the Woodlands brickworks in the other. The route to Blists Hill was across the Lee Dingle bridge. The Woodlands brickworks, situated just to the south-east of the Beeches Hospital, had originally belonged to the Madeley Wood Company but at this time it was owned by George Legge & Son (it closed in 1917). The tramway to the brickworks crossed the Madeley - Ironbridge road not far from the island near to Mawkins Lane; it then ran alongside that road to the top of Madeley Bank where, opposite what is now the Beacon Hotel, it followed the lane leading to the brickworks. 

 

The stables for the horses that helped to work the mine were situated on the left of the lane leading to the colliery from the Madeley - Ironbridge road, almost opposite the Park Inn; they are now a row of cottages. The driver would release the pit horses at the end of the day and they would trot down the bank to the stables, stopping to drink out of a large water butt before going inside to their own particular stalls. At the one end of the stable block was a blacksmith's hearth which was used by the shoeing smith (Mr. Jim Owen) and also for colliery maintenance. The grazing place for the horses was in the adjacent cricket field, and to stop them wandering on to the actual pitch disused pit chain and wire rope was placed around it. 

 

At the time of closure Richard Dodd was manager of the colliery. The last load of coal was brought up the shaft on 21st May 1920 but water was wound up the water pit until August. All the machinery was left in the mine. The beam engine became derelict but, following a fire in the engine house, the engine was finally scrapped and taken away.  The tree covered spoil tips are still very prominent.  

 

Middle Pit, The Lloyds (SJ682033)

Coal, Iron

Mentioned in a lease in 1840, probably working the Pennystone Ironstone. The name “Middle” is a local family name so this may be the name of the Chartermaster. It closed in the 1840s.

 

Milburgh Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal, Red Clay

 

Mill Pit, Dawley (SJ6906)

Coal, Iron

 

Moor Farm Pit, Hinkshay (SJ6907)

Coal, Iron

 

Moor’s Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6505)

Coal

                                                                   

Mossey Green Pit, Ketley (SJ687100)

Coal

Closed in 1929. The shaft is filled.

 

Mount Pit, Wellington (SJ6608)

Coal

 

Mount Pleasant Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6606)

Coal

                                                                   

Muxton Bridge Colliery, Donnington (SJ722133)

Coal 

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 68 men working underground and 30 on the surface. T

 

SJ722133

Winding engine house (C20)

SJ722133

Shaft (filled)

                                           

Nabside Pit, Wombridge (SJ6911)

See Wombridge

                                                                   

Nail Works Pit, Wombridge (SJ699104)

Coal

 

Nelson Pit, Priorslee (SJ7009)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

 

New Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Red Clay

 

New Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6507)

Coal

                                                                   

New Coppice Pit, The Lloyds (SJ688031)

Coal

Shown as a single shaft on an 1840 lease. Probably closed around 1880 when the area was badly affected by a landslip.

                                                                   

New Dale Pit, New Dale (SJ6709)

Coal

 

New Dark Lane Pit, Malinslee (SJ6908)

Coal

                                                                   

New Dingle Pit, The Lloyds (SJ693030)

Coal

A pumping engine was erected here in 1794.

 

New Engine Pit, Lightmoor (SJ682051)

see Rough Park

                                                                                                                                         

New Gravel Leasow Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6805)

Coal, Red Clay

 

New Hadley Pit, Hadley (SJ6711)

Coal

                                                                   

New Hales Pit, Madeley (SJ7104)

Coal

Owned by the Madeley Wood Company. In 1896, the manager was J Raspass with 47 men working underground and 34 on the surface.

                                                                   

New Hill Pit, The Lloyds (SJ693031)

Coal  (aka Dingle, Newell's)

This is the most eastern of the pits in The Lloyds and adjoins an area known as Lees Dingle. The alternative name of Newell’s Pit probably refers to the chartermaster.

It was probably sunk in the mid to late 18th Century and is shown on the 1830s OS Map as two shafts. The 1847 Tithe Map shows the two shafts with buildings and a steam winding engine with outside drum, between them. It was described as “Pit Mounts, Shaft and Buildings owned by Francis Darby and occupied by Madeley Wood Company”. It is likely that one of the side passages in the Tar Tunnel connected with this mine. The mine had probably closed by 1860 and an old miner Fred Richards remembered the site in the early 20th Century as being a pair of open shafts 6 yards from the railway track and 50 yards from the tramway arch beneath the Coalport Branch Railway. There has since been much disturbance of cinder and slag in this area but some building remains were still visible in the 1960s

 

New Invention Pit, Wellington (SJ6608)

Coal

 

New Lawley Pit, Lawley (SJ6708)

Coal

 

New Lodge Pit, Muxton (SJ7313)

Coal

                                                                   

New Mine Adit, Lawley (SJ6708)

Coal

 

New Road Pit, Broseley (SJ6701)

Coal

 

New Sough, St George’s (SJ7111)

Drainage Level

 

New Track Pit, Madeley (SJ6805)

Coal

 

New Victor Pit, Wellington (SJ6609)

Coal

 

New Works Bellpits, New Works (SJ66000900)

Coal

                                                                   

New Works Colliery, New Works (SJ662078)

Coal  (aka Huntington)

Recorded output 1938-1946 was :-

 

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

1,067

2,555

4,034

4,146

3,615

3,249

3,554

3,661

2,954

28,835

 

In 1945 it was owned by the Huntington Mining Co Ltd and there were 8 men working underground and 7 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised but in 1949 it was handed back to J Smallshaw & G Tarr and worked with Shortwoods Colliery. Together they had 32 men working underground and 89 on the surface. At that time it was working the Best, New Mine, Randle and Two Feet Seams.  it closed in 1956.

 

Newell’s Pit, The Lloyds (SJ693031)

See New Hill Pit

 

Nobby Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

Nobbside Colliery, Wombridge (SJ6912)

see Wombridge

                                                                                                                                         

Oakengates Colliery, Oakengates (SJ7011)

Coal

 

Oakengates Station Pit, Oakengates (SJ7011)

Coal

 

Oaks Pit, Mossey Green (SJ6809)

Coal

Closed in 1931.

 

Old Coppice Pit, The Lloyds (SJ689031)

Coal

See Water Engine Air Pit.

                                                                   

Old Dark Lane Pit, Hollinswood (SJ702090)

Coal

                                                                   

Old Furnace Clay Adit, Lightmoor (SJ6705)

Red Clay

 

Old Gin Pit, St George’s (SJ7111)

Coal

                                                                   

Old Hales Pit, Madeley (SJ7104)

Coal

Owned by the Madeley Wood Company. In 1896, the manager was J Raspass with 82 men working underground and 29 on the surface.

 

Old Lawn Pit, Malinslee (SJ7008)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Old Park Colliery, Oakengates (SJ685088)

Coal  (aka Park)

Started in the 19th Century but closed by 1896. Opened up again at a later date and recorded output 1936-1946 was :-

 

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

2,172

2,336

1,951

1,729

-

-

339

1,625

2,540

2,995

3,203

18,890

 

In 1945 it was owned by the E Harris & Sons and there were 7 men working underground and 3 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised.

 

Old Park Lane Pit, St George’s (SJ7111)

Coal

 

Old Water Engine Pit, Ketley (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Omnibus Pit, Ketley (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Overley’s Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Overton's Pit, Donnington (SJ7112)

Coal

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 82 men working underground and 29 on the surface.

 

Owen’s Pit, Wellington (SJ6910)

Coal

                                                                   

Paddock Pit, Dawley (SJ687073)

Coal

                                                                   

Paddock Hill Pit, The Lloyds (SJ682035)

Coal

A pumping engine was erected here in the 1790s.

 

Parish Pit, Dawley (SJ686067)

Coal

 

Park Colliery, Oakengates (SJ6809)

see Old Park

 

Park Forge Pit, Dawley (SJ6806)

Coal

 

Park Lane Pit, Dawley (SJ6809)

Coal

 

Parton’s Colliery, Wombridge (SJ6912)

see Wombridge

                                                                                                                

Peake’s Wood Pit, Wellington (SJ6609)

Coal

 

Pear Tree Pit, Ketley (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Pennystone Pit, Broseley (SJ6801)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Pennystone Ironstone Adit, Ironbridge (SJ674035)

Iron

Little is known about this adit but it was probably worked between the 18th and19th Centuries.  The entrance is a brick-arch on St. Lukes Road, Ironbridge.

 

Phillip’s Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal, Iron

 

Pitchford’s Pit, Old Park (SJ6909)

Coal

                                                                   

Plants Farm Pit, Dawley (SJ6806)

Coal, Fireclay

Recorded output 1938-1946 was :-

 

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

270

-

1,046

3,004

3,470

1,886

1,754

999

1,097

12,506

 

In 1945 it was owned by the Dawley Mining Co Ltd and there were 4 men working underground and 1 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised but in 1949 it was handed back to the company, with 4 men working underground and 1 on the surface. At that time it was working the Little Flint Seam.

 

Platform Pit, Madeley (SJ6904)

Coal, Iron

 

Podmore & Teague’s Pit, Ketley (SJ6811)

Coal

 

Pool Hill Pit, Dawley (SJ6806)

Coal

                                                                   

Portley Pit, Dawley (SJ686071)

Coal

 

Pottery Pit, Broseley (SJ6801)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Prestage's Mine, Broseley (SJ6802)

See Broseley

                                                                   

Price's Pit, Coalmoor (SJ6607)

Fireclay

                                                                   

Prince’s End Pit, Lawley (SJ6708)

Coal, Iron

In 1945 it was owned by the Wrekin Coal Co Ltd and was worked together with Station Nos 1-2 Pits. In total there were 15 men working underground and 5 on surface. In 1947 there were a total of 70 men working and 7,465 tons of coal were produced. It closed in 1948.

                                                                   

Priorslee Colliery, Hollinswood (SJ7008)

Coal

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1923 the manager was S Champion Jones , with 196 men working underground and 40 on the surface. At that time it was linked to Stafford Colliery and the manpower figures are combined.

 

Prospect Pit, Lawley (SJ6608)

Coal  (aka Lawley Prospect)

                                           

Pudley Hill Pit, Hollinswood (SJ700093)

Coal

                                                                   

Quarry Pit, Mossy Green (SJ6810)

Coal, Fireclay

 

Queen’s Head Pit, St George’s (SJ7111)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Queens Wood Pit, Oakengates (SJ6911)

Coal

 

Randlay Pit, Randlay (SJ7008)

Coal, Iron

 

Randle Mine, Benthall (SJ6603)

see Benthall Lane

                                                                   

Randle Pit, Dawley (SJ6806)

Coal

 In 1945 it was owned by the Doseley Pipe Co Ltd and there were 23 men working underground and 1 on the surface. in 1949 it was owned by Doseley Pipe Co Ltd, with 20 men working underground and 2 on the surface. At that time it was working the Clay, Nine Feet, Randle and Two Feet Seams.

                                           

Red Lake Pit, Dawley (SJ6810)

Coal, Fireclay

 

Red Lane Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

                                                                   

Red Lion Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal

 

Rhodes’ Pit, Old Park (SJ6909)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Rickyard Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896 it was recorded as “standing”.

 

Ridge’s Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6805)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Rock Mine, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

                                                                   

Rock Colliery, Dawley (SJ683090)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

Recorded output 1936-1946 was :-

 

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

1,606

1,811

1,837

1,921

2,061

1,712

1,714

1,661

1,475

1,391

1,524

18,713

 

In 1945 it was owned by the James Jones & Sons Ltd and there were 7 men working underground and 2 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised but in 1949 it was handed back to the company, with 7 men working underground and 2 on the surface. At that time it was working the Little Flint Seam. It closed in 1964 and the shaft is now filled.

 

Rock Farm Pit, Mossy Green (SJ6810)

See Rock (Mossy Green)

                                                                   

Rock Pit, Lawley Bank (SJ6808)

Coal

                                                                   

Rock Pit, Mossy Green (SJ6810)

Coal  (aka Rock Farm)

                                                                   

Rock Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Rock Village Pit, Dawley (SJ6807)

Coal

 

Rookery Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, iron

                                                                   

Rose & Crown Pit, Oakengates (SJ688107)

Coal

                                                                   

Rough Park Pit, Lightmoor (SJ682051)

Coal  (aka New Engine)

                                                                   

Roughfields Pit, Wellington (SJ6610)

Coal

                                                                   

Round Oak Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal

                                                                   

Roundhouse Pit, Wombridge (SJ6911)

Coal

 

Rowe’s Pit, Halesfield (SJ7105)

Coal

 

Rudgewood Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Sale Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

Sam Hyde’s Pit, Wrockwardine Wood (SJ7011)

Coal

 

Shaw’s Pit, Jackfield (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

 

Shaw’s Pit, Madeley (SJ698038)

See Shawfield Pit

Closed by 1896.

                                                                   

Shawfield Pit, Madeley (SJ698038)

Coal  (aka Shaw’s)

Owned by the Madeley Wood Company. In 1896, the manager was J Raspass with 57 men working underground and 10 on the surface.

 

Shepherd’s Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6507)

Coal, Iron

                                           

Shortwood Colliery, New Works (SJ658096)

Coal

Recorded output 1939-1946 was :-

 

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

959

909

4,219

7,608

9,035

7,791

11,213

12,077

53,811

 

In 1945 it was owned by J Smallshaw & G Tarr and there were 21 men working underground and 8 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised and in 1949 it was handed back to J Smallshaw & G Tarr, its statistics being combined with New Works Pit. At that time it was working the Best, New Mine, Randle and Two Feet Seams. It was the last small private drift coal mine in Shropshire and closed in 1970

                                                                   

Shrubbery Colliery, Ketley Bank (SJ687101)

Coal

Started in the 19th Century but it had closed by 1896. Opened up again in the early 1920s and employed about 30 men in the mid-1920s. In 1937 there were 9 men underground and 4 on surface. It was working the Big Flint and New Mine seams, the manager being E Parton. The shaft was worked by a horse-gin but underground a motor had just been installed. There were no guides in the shaft and no safety hook between the chains and the rope. These chains carried a box about 3ft x 3ft by 9 inches deep and were attached to each corner. The seam was about 3ft at the face and about 12 men were employed. There was a Siskol drilling machine but everything else was done by hand. The coal was loaded into a small tub, then pushed to the cage by hand. It was emptied onto a crude screen at the surface. The New Mine seam was about 100ft deep, the likely depth of the shaft. The Big Flint Coal seam would be about 30ft down and 4ft 6in thick, Pennystone Ironstone at 90ft and 16ft thick and New Mine Coal immediately below this at 5ft thick. At 60ft below this there were 6 more seams of coal and two or three seams of useful fireclay. The main winding engine was a horse named Betsy. The horse-gin, which was some 20-30 yards away from the shaft, was of the undershot variety (so that the horse Betsy stepped over the rope at every revolution) rather than the better-known overhead variety in which the horse passed under the rope at each turn. This 1 horsepower system was replaced by a tiny ¼ horsepower synchronous AC motor. Recorded output 1936-1946 was :-

 

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

2,811

436

820

1,249

951

1,406

1,377

1,928

1,870

1,156

664

14,668

 

In 1945 it was owned by J H Woodfin and there were 10 men working underground and 7 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised but in 1949 it was handed back to the previous owner J H Woodfin, with 7 men working underground and 4 on the surface. At that time it was working the New Mine Seam and the manager was A E Hand. It closed in the 1950s.

                                           

Silver Hill Pit, Benthall (SJ6601)

Coal

 

Slang Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Slaughter Colliery, Donnington (SJ7212)

see Lodgebank

 

Slew Brook Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6507

Coal

                                                                   

Smalley Hill Pit, Horsehay (SJ6706)

Coal, Fireclay

Recorded output 1942-1946 was :-

 

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

1,339

3,830

4,588

4,621

3,743

18,121

 

In 1945 it was owned by the London Fields Colliery Co Ltd and there were 2 men working underground and 1 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised but in 1949 it was handed back to the company, with 11 men working underground and 4 on the surface. At that time it was working the New Mine Seam.

                                                                   

Smith's Gin Pit, The Lloyds (SJ686032)

See Lloyds Pit.

 

Snedshill Pit, Snedshill (SJ7010)

Coal

 

Sour Leasow Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

Southall Pit, Southall (SJ6906)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Spout Pit, Dawley (SJ695084)

Coal

 

Spratt’s Castle Pit, Dawley (SJ6806)

Coal

 

Spring Meadow Pit, Madeley (SJ7004)

Coal

The Wellington Journal & Shrewsbury News of January 19th 1895 recorded “William Worrall, coal miner, residing at Dawley, sued James Ferriday, colliery proprietor, Dawley, for 14 days' wages (£l-10s) in lieu of notice, and three tons of coal at 8s. per ton, £1-4s. Mr Leake represented the plaintiff, and Mr Carrane the defendant. Mr Leake stated that this was a test case, and would decide similar claims made by two other colliers, named Jones and Corbett. Plaintiff stated: I am a miner, living at Dawley, and in March, 1894, I entered into an engagement to work for Mr Ferriday at Spring Meadow Pit as holer at 3s. 5d per day, and it was usual to have a ton of coal every four weeks. At the end of the first month I asked the defendant to send my coal, and he replied, "I will see about it." He did not send the coal, but after I had worked for him five months I got a load of coal, and then defendant agreed to give us (witness, Jones, and Corbett) a load of coal every six weeks, stating that the pit was not paying, and he could not afford to give us a load every month. In December, when I went down the pit to work, the props were not ready, and I ultimately came up the pit. On the following Monday, when I went to the pit, I saw John Davies, banksman, who told us we were not to go down, because we refused to work on Saturday. The defendant told us that we had served him dirty, and I replied, "Not so dirty as you served us by setting other people on and letting us play." Defendant then said, "You can have your money if you like," and he paid us.

 

After he did so we said we should require a fortnight’s notice and our coal. He replied, "I shall not give it you." Cross-examined by Mr Carrane: I was not told when engaged I should have no coal. Nothing was said about it. We did strike until we had our coal. Edward Corbett, another miner, corroborated the previous evidence, as also did Samuel Jones. Mr Leake said this was the case for the plaintiff. The defendant went into the box and stated the he was a certificated mining engineer, and had opened the colliery 12 months last September. He engaged Worrall after repeated applications as a holer. At the same he told him there was no allowance coal. Some time after the plaintiff asked for coal, and then he referred him to the agreement he started upon. It was not the custom for a single man to have coal. It was on October 16th that the strike took place, when the men said they would not work any longer under the old agreement, and subsequently he decided to give them a load of coal every six weeks. Because the plaintiff and the other men refused to work on a Saturday, he gave instructions that he should not require them on the following Monday. On that date they came up to the machine and asked for their money, and he gave instructions for them to be paid, nothing was said about 14 days' notice.

 

Noah Hyde, collier, gave evidence, which was rather in favour of the plaintiff. Samuel Morgan, underlooker, stated that the plaintiffs knew very well that they were not to have any coal. Jas. Bailey (Dawley Green), timber setter at this colliery, deposed that the plaintiff refused to work on the day in question, and would not help to set the timber. Robert Bryce, and Mr John Fletcher, chartermaster, Madeley, independent witnesses, gave evidence, the latter stating that he always gave coal to men who were entitled to it. In summing up, his Honour observed that he was of opinion that the men were entitled to one ton of coal each, and also their wages. He did not think their refusing to work on the Saturday was a case for instant dismissal, and he held they were entitled to such amount of wages in lieu of notice on their average earnings in the pits for the last few months, which in Worrall’s case meant a verdict for £1-15s. 3d and costs. The hearing of this case occupied the Court nearly four hours.

 

Spring Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

 

Spring Village Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Springwell Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal

In 1872, 8 miners were killed "riding the chain" because there was no cage and the chain was old and worn. 

                                                                   

Squires Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal

                                                                   

St George's Pit, Donnington (SJ7010)

Coal

                                                                   

Stablehill Mine, Broseley (SJ681021)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Stafford Colliery, Priorslee (SJ709094)

Coal

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 231 men working underground and 48 on the surface. In 1923 it was linked to Priorslee Colliery and it closed in 1926.

 

Station Bottom Pit, Ketley (SJ6910)

Coal

                                                                   

Station Pit, Lawley Bank (SJ6808)

Coal

There were two pits numbered Station No 1 and Station No 2. In 1945 they were owned by the Wrekin Coal Co Ltd and were worked together with Prince’s End Pit. In total there were 15 men working underground and 5 on surface.

                                                                   

Station Road Pit, Lawley Bank (SJ6808)

Coal

 

Station Top Pit, Ketley (SJ6910)

Coal

 

Steeraway Mine, Wellington (SJ653097)

Limestone

 

SJ654096

2 limekilns (C19)

SJ64420936

Shaft (collapsed)

SJ653097

Adit (open)

SJ654096

Shaft (filled)

                                                                   

Steeraway Pit, Wellington (SJ653096)

Coal

 

Steven’s Pit, Donnington (SJ7112)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Stilehouse Pit, The Lloyds (SJ681033)

Coal  (aka Lloyds Stile, Lloyds Stile House)

Mentioned in a lease in 1840.  The name Lloyd was probably that of a chartermaster. Closed in the 1830s as the coal reserves became exhausted.

 

Stirchley Colliery, Hollinswood (SJ7008)

Coal

 

Stirchley Grange Pit, Stirchley (SJ7007)

Coal, Red Clay

 

Stirchley Level, Stirchley (SJ6906)

Drainage Level

 

Stocking Mine, Broseley (SJ6802)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Stone Pit Tunnel, Madeley Green (SJ679037)

Access Tunnel

Shown on the 1883 OS Map with a tramway and a drainage channel leading from it. It is possible that this connected with the Ironstone mine to the west of Harris Lane and may have been covered later with spoil from Styches Pit.

 

Stoneyhill Mine, Lightmoor (SJ66900582)

Limestone

The adits are now blocked.

                                                                   

Styches Colliery, Madeley (SJ681039)

Coal

Owned by the Madeley Wood Company. In 1896, the manager was J Raspass with 29 men working underground and 22 on the surface.

 

Sunnyside Pit, Overdale (SJ6810)

Coal

                                                                   

Sutherland Pit, Oakengates (SJ6910)

Coal

 

Swan Meadow Pit, Overdale (SJ6810)

Coal

                                                                   

Swan Pit, Madeley (SJ6903)

Coal

In 1945 it was owned by the Moors Colliery Co Ltd and there were 19 men working underground and 3 on the surface.

                                                                   

Tar Tunnel, Coalport (SJ694025)

Access Tunnel

In 1786, William Reynolds proposed the idea of an underground canal to link Blists Hill Mine to the River Severn.  Work started in June 1787 as the Coalbrookdale Navigation but, 300 yards, in the workmen struck a spring of natural bitumen oozing out of the rock.  . Reynolds realised the commercial potential of this discovery and about 4,500 gallons of bitumen were initially collected per week, although this soon reduced to 1,000 gallons for several years.  The tunnel was continued to underneath Blists Hill but does not appear to have ever performed its original function, although it did provide additional ventilation for the mine.  By 1792, the surface Shropshire Canal passed by Blists Hill Mine so this tunnel was no longer needed. The bitumen was collected in wells and, in 1796, a 1,000 yard long plateway was built along the tunnel to transport it out in wagons.  Outside the mouth of the tunnel, it was boiled in large cauldrons to convert it into pitch.  It was used for the preservation of timber and rope, caulking ships, lamp fuel and varnish.  Some was even made into “Betton’s British Oil”, a medicinal preparation for the treatment of rheumatic and skin complaints such as scurvy.  By the 1820s, only 10 barrels per year were being obtained and by 1843 it had dried up altogether. By 1847, a house had been built over the entrance, which afterwards could only be reached through the cellar.  It was still used for mine ventilation until the 1930s.  It was re-discovered in 1965 by members of Shropshire Caving & Mining Club and has subsequently became an underground tourist attraction as part of Ironbridge Gorge Museum.

 

Tarry Pit, Priorslee (SJ7009)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

 

Teece’s Pit, Lawley (SJ6809)

Coal

 

Three Stile Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Tinning Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Tipton’s Wharf Pit, Malinslee (SJ6908)

Coal, Iron

 

Tom Rowe’s Pit, Jackfield (SJ6803)

Coal

                                                                   

Topyard Pit, Doseley (SJ680062)

Coal

 

Town Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal

 

Toye’s Pit, Lightmoor (SJ6705)

Coal, Red Clay

                                                                   

Tramway Tunnel, Ironbridge (SJ678035)

Access Tunnel

 

This is a modern name for a tunnel that is shown on the 1849 Tithe Map as it has a tramway leading from it. It is stone arched and about 4ft high.  The tithe map also shows nearby the word “Spout”, the local name for a drainage level, so it might have served that purpose.

                                                                   

Tramway Tunnel, Stirchley (SJ696072)

Access Tunnel

In Town Park on the site of Stirchley Ironworks.

 

Trench Level, Trench (SJ6913)

Drainage Level

 

Tub Engine Pit, Donnington Wood (SJ7012)

Coal, Iron

 

Tuckies Pit, Jackfield (SJ689025)

Red Clay

In 1896 there was an explosion of firedamp caused by an unguarded candle but nobody was injured.

 

SJ693024

Pumping engine house (C19)

SJ691025

Adit (open)

SJ693024

Engine Shaft (filled)

 

Tunnel Piece Pit, New Works (SJ6609)

Coal

                                           

Turner's Yard Mine, Broseley (SJ693001)

Coal, Fireclay

On 11th December 1890, William Corfield (43) was found dead when walking out behind a donkey drawing a load, He had only left men at the face a few minutes before and a post-mortem examination revealed he had died of heart disease, he was not injured in any way. In 1945 it was owned by the Prestage & Broseley Tileries Co Ltd and there were 8 men working underground and 3 on the surface. in 1949 there were 11 men working underground and 3 on the surface. At that time it was working the No 1 Seam.

                                                                   

Union Pit, The Lloyds (SJ688030)

Coal

There were two engines in 1790s, with the engine houses almost midway between this pit and Wharf Pit. By 1840, when it is shown on a lease, there was only one engine house connected by winding chain from an outside drum but supported by at least 2 roller posts.  The pit had closed by 1880.

                                                                   

Upper Farm Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

                                                                   

Victoria Pit, Ketley (SJ6710)

Coal, Fireclay

The Wellington Journal & Shrewsbury News of November 18th 1911 recorded “Albert Edward Millward of King Street, Dawley, claimed from Messrs Glaze and Whorton, proprietors of a colliery at Ketley Town, the sum of £4 15s for repairs at the pit. The plaintiff stated that from instructions received from one of defendant's employees, Thomas Churm, whose orders were endorsed by Mr Glaze, he had been engaged from February 13th to March 13th in damp mechanical work: in which he had employed a labourer and fitter. Having finished the work he sent in his account and payment was promised. Mr Whorton (managing partner), in cross-examination, said that Millward, who considered himself a practical blacksmith, had taken his instructions from Churm who was a miner. The work done was stated to be insertion of five teeth and repairing a wheel, repairs to cog wheel, piston, boiler, tacking, brass tap, box and file. Mr Glaze said he was a member of Victoria Colliery Company, Ketley and that he received a letter from Millward and he authorised him to proceed with the work little thinking that the charge would be so much. A reasonable charge would have been £2 10s. Judgment was given for the plaintiff for the full amount claimed.

 

Vigar Drift, Broseley (SJ6703)

Coal, Fireclay

in 1949 it was owned by Benthall Stoneware (Ironbridge)) Ltd, with 2 men working underground and 1 on the surface.

 

Village Pit, Priorslee (SJ7110)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

                                                                   

Wagoner's Field Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal

                                                                   

Walkers Earth Mine, Benthall (SJ667034)

Walkers Earth

The mine was probably worked in the late 18th or early 19th Centuries. It is shown as “Mouth of Level” on the 1849 Tithe Map and more recent maps show the entrance as “Washhouse”.  The remains of a building existed in the 1960s and this may have been where the Walkers Earth was used to wash wool fleeces.

 

Walker’s Pit, Ketley (SJ6811)

Coal

                                                                   

Wallace’s Mine, Jackfield (SJ6809027)

Red Clay  (aka Bonny, Jolly)

                                                                   

Wallett's Pit, The Lloyds (SJ691031)

Coal

Shown in an 1840 lease with a building and horse gin. Wallet is a local family name and he was probably a chartermaster of this pit in the 17th or early 18th Century. Closed by 1896.

 

Wallow’s Pit, Stirchley (SJ6906)

Coal

 

Water Pit, Jackfield (SJ6803)

Coal, Iron

                                                                   

Water Engine Pit, Wombridge (SJ6911)

Coal

 

Water Engine Pit, The Lloyds (SJ689030)

Coal

A pumping engine was erected here in 1726. This was probably connected to the workings of Lloyds Pit.

                                                                   

Water Engine Air Pit, The Lloyds (SJ689031)

Coal  (aka Old Coppice Pit)

Working in 1726, probably a ventilation shaft associated with the adjacent Water Engine Pit.

                                                                   

Waterloo Pit, Wellington (SJ6610)

Coal

 

Watling Street Grange Pit, Donnington (SJ721114)

see Grange

                                                                   

Waxhill Barracks Colliery, Donnington (SJ718129)

Coal  (aka Barracks)

Owned by the Lilleshall Company. In 1896, the manager was Noel Beech with 40 men working underground and 25 on the surface.

                                                                   

Wellington Road Pit, Horsehay (SJ6707)

Coal  (aka Dog-in-Lane)

Recorded output 1939-1946 was :-

 

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

275

3,397

3,504

1,590

2,066

2,520

2,298

118

15,768

 

In 1945 it was owned by H A L Price and there were 9 men working underground and 3 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised.

                                                                   

Wesley Road Tunnel, Madeley Green (SJ678035)

Access Tunnel

         

 

A brick-arched tunnel, 6ft high and 6ft wide, with the top of the arch being about 6ft below the road surface. It heads in the direction of Madeley in one direction and Ironbridge in the other, although collapses prevent modern exploration. It is likely that it connected with a nearby inclined plane and served to get underneath the road.

 

Westcroft Pit, Priorslee (SJ7009)

Coal, Fireclay, Iron

 

Whaleymore Wood Pit, Ketley (SJ6811)

Coal

                                           

Wharf Pit, Malinslee (SJ700082)

Coal

 

Wharf Pit, Mossey Green (SJ6910)

Coal

                                                                   

Wharf Pit, The Lloyds (SJ688030)

Coal

There were two engines in 1790s, with the engine houses almost midway between this pit and Union Pit. By 1840, when it is shown on a lease, there was only one engine house connected by winding chain from an outside drum but supported by at least 2 roller posts.  The pit had closed by 1880.

 

White Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

White Brick Kiln Mine, Broseley (SJ6802)

Red Clay

 

White Level, Broseley (SJ6801)

Fireclay

 

Whitehead Pit, Old Park (SJ6809)

Coal, Iron

 

Willey Park Pit, Broseley (SJ6802)

Coal

 

Willowmoor Pit, Little Wenlock (SJ6408)

Coal

                                                                   

Wombridge Colliery, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal  (aka Deep Granville, Hill, Nabside, Nobbside, Parton’s)

 

Wombridge Engine Colliery, Wombridge (SJ6912)

see Wombridge

                                                                                                                                         

Wombridge Farm Pit, Wombridge (SJ6911)

Coal

 

Wombridge Hill Pit, Wombridge (SJ6811)

Coal

                                                                   

Wood Pit, Dawley (SJ696081)

Coal

                                                                   

Wood Pits, Coalmoor (SJ6607)

Coal, Fireclay

There were 5 pits called Wood Pit No 1, etc.

 

Woodfield Pit, Donnington (SJ7113)

Coal, Iron

 

Woodfinch Pit, Ketley (SJ6811)

Coal

                                                                   

Woodhouse Colliery, Donnington (SJ712104)

Coal, Iron

Owned by the Lilleshall Company and split into 2 separate workings called Woodhouse No 1 and Woodhouse No 2. Details from the Mineral Statistics are :-

 

Year

Manager

Men Underground

Men

Surface

1896

Noel Beech (Nos 1 & 2)

202

55

1923

John Greene (Nos 1 & 2)

595

111

1933

H Wroe (No 2)

418

84

1940

H Wroe (No 2)

260

67

 

An accident in 1916 resulted in a notable act of heroism when 5 men were injured by a winding mishap. While they were being rescued, a local doctor called Justin McCarthy descended the shaft by a sling to give them medical supervision. Woodhouse No 1 closed in 1931 and Woodhouse No 2 in 1940.

 

Woodland Green Pit, Broseley (SJ6702)

Red Clay

 

Woodland Grove Pit, Broseley (SJ6702)

 See Woodland Green

                                                                   

Woodlands Mine, Ironbridge (SJ6603)

Red Clay

                                                                   

Woodside Mine, Coalbrookdale (SJ673048)

Coal

Recorded output 1944-1946 was :-

 

1944

1945

1946

Total tons

70

1,912

3,724

5,706

 

In 1945 it was owned by the Woodside Mining Company and there were 12 men working underground and 4 on the surface. In 1947 it was nationalised.

 

Woodwell Pit, Overdale (SJ6810)

Coal

                                                                   

Works Mine, Jackfield (SJ6803)

Red Clay

 

Worrall’s Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal

 

Wrekin Pit, Lawley (SJ6609)

Coal

                                                                   

Wrockwardine Pit, Donnington (SJ6911)

Coal

 

Wycherley Pit, Coalbrookdale (SJ6705)

Coal

                                                                   

Wynd Road Mine, Jackfield (SJ6803)

Red Clay                                                   

 

Yard Pit, Dawley (SJ6907)

Coal

 

Yew Tree Pit, Broseley (SJ6702)

Coal

 

Further Reading

Broseley Abandonment Plans

Broseley Burning Spring

Broseley Miners at Worsley

Broseley Mining Incidents

Broseley Mining

Broseley Mining Miscellany

Coal at Caughley

Coal Nationalisation 50 Years On

Coalbrookdale Coalfield - D Coxill

Coalbrookdale Coalfield - D Coxill & K Lake

Coalbrookdale Coalfield Geological Memoir

Early Mining Maps of the Ironbridge Gorge

History of Broseley

John Byng's Visits to Broseley

Ketley Hill Tunnels

List of Shropshire Mines 1869-1950

List of Shropshire Mines 1896

Making Pitch

Memories of Madeley

Shropshire Wrought Iron Industry

Twelve Mines of Broseley