Shropshire

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North Shropshire

Orefield

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Mining

 

Mine Sites

Clee Hills

Coalfield

Coalbrookdale

Coalfield

Forest of Wyre

Coalfield

Lilleshall

Limestone

N Shropshire

Coalfield

N Shropshire Orefield

Shrewsbury

Coalfield

S Shropshire

Orefield

 

 

The land to the north and north-east of Shrewsbury is fairly flat but, where the isolated wooded hills occur, copper was often found in the Triassic sandstone as green malachite.  This has been mined at a number of places but most of these sites are now overgrown and difficult to recognise.  To the north-west, the ground becomes more hilly and lead was found here with the copper and worked from a very early time.

 

Blodwel Mine, Porth-y-Waen (SJ2623)

Lead

 

Caregwyfa Mine, Pant (SJ265219)

Lead, Silver

The mine had been worked in the early 12th Century but by 1146 it was disused. During a national shortage of silver, many of the old mines were prospected to see if they could be reworked and Carregwfa was one of these. By 1163, however, high volumes of silver from the mines of Northumberland and Durham had reduced the price of silver and meant that the mine could not be worked profitably.  In that year also, the Welsh rebel Owain Cyfeiliog captured the adjacent Carreghofa Castle and the area of the mine.  The mine ceased working and the land was not taken back from the Welsh until 1187.  In 1192, King Richard I was captured on his way back from the Crusades and ransomed for 150,000 Marks (65,000 pounds of silver).  The Bishop of Salisbury, Hubert Walter, was given the job of raising the money and he decided that the mine should be reopened to provide silver towards the ransom.  In 1194, Carregwfa Castle was garrisoned with soldiers to protect the mine from the Welsh and to guard shipments of the silver to Shrewsbury Mint.  Records of money spent on the castle show that it cost over £28 in wages for the knights and armed men. 

 

The Sheriff of Shropshire (based in Shrewsbury) was ordered to undertake preparatory work at the mine and 20 mattocks were sent to the castle to be issued to the miners.  The miner in charge was Godfrey Rufus and there were two other miners called Roger and William.  They started work in July 1194 and surface operations were managed by the Archbishop’s clerk Joseph Aaron. To enable him to make a start, he was given £20 as working capital from the Sheriff. In the period from June 1194 to August 1195 the total amount of silver produced only came to the value of £20 7s 8d. It was quickly realised that the old miners had left very little ore in the mine and it closed soon after.  More money was spent on the project than went into the coffers of the commissioners. The mine was located just north of the present day quarry, which has removed part of it.

 

SJ264218

Shaft (collapsed)

 

Clive Mine, Clive (SJ514239)

Copper  (aka Drepewood, Threapwood)

 

Craig-llwyn Mine, Croesau Bach (SJ238279)

Lead

 

Crickheath Hill Mine, Pant (SJ274232)

Copper, Lead

Mining was carried out between 1884-1886, albeit on a small scale.  There are several adits and shafts but all were worked under the name of Crickheath Hill Mine in the 19th Century. There are two short adits in a small quarry west of Pant.  No.1 Adit goes for about 180ft with a passage fork.  No.2 Adit goes for over 200ft and has a stream of water flowing out.  In another quarry to the north-west are Nos. 3 & 4 Adits which are only short.  In yet another quarry, to the east of the track, is the entrance to No.5 Adit which leads to over 2,000ft of workings on three levels.  Next to this is the gated No.6 Adit which also has a network of workings.  To the west of the track is a line of three shafts.  The first is covered by boulders, the second is covered by a steel plate and descends 40ft to a short passage.  The third is open but is blocked with debris at the bottom.  Close by is a cutting leading to a collapsed adit.  To the north is a possible shaft which is the site of an old pump.  Further north still is a spoil tip with a filled shaft.

 

Mineral

Period

Tons

Lead

1884

85

Zinc

1884

60

 

SJ269235

Several small adits (open)

SJ272231

No.4 Level (open)

SJ273231

No.3 Level (open)

SJ273233

Shaft (open)

SJ273233

Shaft (open)

SJ274232

No.5 Level (open)

SJ274232

No.6 Level (open)

SJ275226

No.1 Level (open)

SJ275226

No.2 Level (open)

 

Drepewood Mine, Clive (SJ514239)

See Clive Mine

 

Eardiston Mine, Eardiston (SJ366247)

See Rednal Mine

 

Hawkstone Mine, Weston Heath (SJ57302970)

Copper

Worked between 1697-1828. The site of this mine is now in Hawkstone Park.  There was a 10ft deep shaft leading to a 10ft long level that was filled in 1977 and another that is grilled but “lost” in the shrubbery.  It is not known if the grotto was once a mine or whether it was driven purely for decorative purposes.

 

SJ57302970

Adit (open)

SJ576295

Shaft (grilled)

SJ587292

Shaft (filled)

 

Lane End Mine, Eardiston (SJ36552460)

see Rednal

 

Lee Brockhurst Mine, Lee Brockhurst (SJ5527)

Copper

Some trials for copper took place near Lee Brockhurst but the exact location is unknown.  There were also mine shafts on the Terrace at Hawkstone Park but these were filled in some years ago.  In 1697, a partnership of local landowners was formed to mine copper and other ores at these locations but it could only have been on a small scale. 

 

Llanymynech Mine, Pant (SJ265222)

Lead

To the north of Llanymynech Ogof is an open 19th century adit which leads to the bottom of earlier stope workings.  South-west are some smaller workings which are very difficult to find.

 

SJ263218

Adit (open)

SJ263218

Shaft (collapsed)

SJ265223

Adit (open)

 

Llanymynech Ogof, Pant (SJ266222)

Copper, Lead, Zinc

 

Llynclys Hill Mine, Llynclys (SJ274238)

Lead

 

Marchamley Mine, Marchamley (SJ587292)

Copper

                                                             

Moelydd Mine, Treflach (SJ252252)

Lead

 

Nantmawr Mine, Nantmawr (SJ246251)

Lead

 

Pim Hill Mine, Harmer Hill (SJ488215)

Cobalt, Copper, Vanadium

Mining was taking place here in 1643 when King Charles I visited the area during the English Civil War.  It immediately ceased, however, when the miners were forced to join the army being raised by the King.  Their stock of copper ore, "a sort of blue stone", was subsequently used in road works so it is presumed that the miners did not return from the war.  In the latter part of the 17th Century, Derbyshire miners were employed to search for copper ore on behalf of the Earl of Bridgewater.  Several trial shafts were sunk and one was reputed to have reached a depth of 180ft.  Despite all this, little ore was found and activities ceased by the turn of the century.  The mine was then the subject of a 14 year mining lease in 1710 from the Countess of Bridgewater to Abraham Darby of the Coalbrookdale Company. They had opened a brass works in Coalbrookdale and wanted  to obtain a local source of copper.  The site did not live up to his expectations, however, and by 1714 he was importing copper from the Lake District.  The only other period of working seems to have been between 1870-78 when copper, cobalt and vanadium were mined. A partly filled entrance leads to an adit which ends at a shaft.  There may have been other ways on but these have been blocked by infill.  Nearby are two filled shafts.

 

SJ487214

Open vein workings (C18)

SJ487214

Adit (open)

SJ487214

Shaft (open)

SJ487215

Shaft (filled)

SJ487216

Shaft (filled)

 

Prees Mine, Prees Green (SJ5632)

Copper

                                                             

Rednal Mine, Eardiston (SJ366247)

Cobalt, Copper, Iron, Manganese  (aka Eardiston. Lane End)

 

Spendiloes Mine, Grinshill (SJ520236)

Copper

There is a reference to a Spendiloes Mine near Grinshill Church which Roger Acherley proposed to develop in 1711. 

 

Threapwood Mine, Clive (SJ514239)

See Clive Mine

                                                             

Weston Heath Mine, Weston Heath (SJ5627)

Copper

In 1740, it was recorded that the Reverend Snelson had searched for copper ore at Weston but "had his labour for his pains, and his expense for his trouble".  Despite this, small scale mining seems to have continued at Weston until the early 19th Century.

 

Wixhill Mine, Weston (SJ559287)

Copper

Worked between 1697-1867. A shaft to the east of the road has been partly filled and capped with concrete but is flooded to near surface. Higher up the hillside to the north-east is an open adit which follows a vein for a short distance.  Near the entrance to this is a filled shaft.  Further north is another short adit.

 

Yorton Bank Mine, Yorton (SJ499238)

Copper

To the north-east of Yorton there was a shaft reported by the Geological Survey to be 150ft deep. This would have been for copper but no other information is known.  Several people have unsuccessfully searched for the entrance, which is said to be under a grate in the road, and it must remain a mystery.